Getting Grants

More Funding Tips

New Banking Regs

Sponsors for Golf

Corporate Angels

Corrections or additions?

These articles by Peter J. Mladineo and Barbara Fox were published in U.S. 1 Newspaper on June 24, 1998, all rights reserved.

Survival Guide II

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Getting Grants

Grantseekers -- don't spin your wheels without understanding the politics. That's just one of the nuggets you will take away from a one-day workshop, "Myths, Magic and Money: the Secrets of Successful Grantseeking," on Thursday, June 25, from 8:30 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. at the New Jersey Hospital Association, 760 Alexander Road. Sponsored by the Center for Non-Profit Corporations and the New Jersey Grants Guide, the cost is $90 and includes a 15 percent discount on the New Jersey Grants Guide. Call 732-227-0800.

Paul Totito is the newly appointed president of the center, which recently moved from 13 Roszel Road to Livingston Avenue in New Brunswick. He was formerly executive director of the Arc of New Jersey, a charitable umbrella organization with 600 member organizations statewide.

Bella August and Richard Male present funding trends in New Jersey and the United States. They point out that local governments and schools now compete for private grant funds, and that less federal money is available, except for such trendy areas as day care, Head Start, welfare reform, job creation, community development, and youth programs, especially religious/faith-based urban youth work.

Religious contributions will remain steady, predicts Male. Though corporate philanthropy will remain flat, especially with the mergers, foundation dollars have increased due to stock market gains. Corporate giving will target "cause-related" marketing approaches and will be increasingly focused on employee involvement. But as the economy grows, individual donor contributions will increase and will continue to constitute 90 percent of all philanthropic donations.

Male will also present 12 key principles for grantseekers:

People give to other people, so establishing a relationship with the donor is key.

People give because of self interest, so learn why donors give.

Money follows people, so get them involved through volunteering.

Ask for a "specific" sum of money for a specific purpose.

Marketing is how people know you. There is a direct correlation between people knowing about your good programs and raising money.

Plan ahead -- raising money takes time.

Male, the president of Denver-based Grants Guide Plus, has been involved in fundraising for grassroots organizations at the neighborhood, statewide, and national level for 27 years. His New Jersey Grants Guide sells for $100 to organizations with budgets of $100,000 or less. Otherwise it is $149, including updates every six months plus a useful calendar.

He admits that because of astronomical research costs (almost 7,000 hours went into the first edition) he won't make a profit on New Jersey's guide until the second edition comes out. And yes, though his business is with nonprofits, his is a for-profit business (E-mail: GrantPlus@aol.com, http://www.grantseeker.com/ggp. "A lot of my personal money as well as that of small investors went into the books," says Male.

His first directory was for Ohio, and he turned to New Jersey next, partly because he had a good relationship with Elliott Lee, the center's former director. Another reason was that New Jersey is one of the 10 largest states and has a concentration of funders. New Jersey does have an existing grants guide, the Mitchell Guide, published by Janet Mitchell (E-mail: njfunds@aol.com. But Male's guide adds religious and corporate funders and public agencies plus a very strong indexes in interest areas, geographic location, types of support, and trustees.

Male's second presentation of the morning is with Bette Scott, executive director of the Council of New Jersey Grantmakers, and is about the Eight Habits of Highly Effective Grantseekers.

During a working lunch each group of participants will meet with one of the attending "funders," who include Chris Fahey from Schering Plough, Nancy Kieling from the Princeton Area Community Foundation, Debra Joy Pere of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation's NJ Health Initiatives, Shirley Ward of Public Service Electric & Gas, Lloyd Oxford of the Black United Fund, Barbara Rambo and Gail Cass of First Union National Bank, Irene Cooper-Basch of NBI Healthcare Foundation, and William Engel of the Union Foundation.

Concurrent afternoon sessions range from "Negotiating the Public Thoroughfare: Tips for Seeking Funds from Government" by Mary Ann Barkus to "Starting at Ground Zero: Basic Tips for Beginning Outreach and Research." Barkus is program manager with the New Jersey Department of Community Affairs' office of housing advocacy. Elliott Lee (former director of the Center for Non-Profit Corporations, now program officer of the Victoria Foundation) offers "Collaboration: Opportunities and Pitfalls," and Male tells about "Involving Your Board and Volunteers in Fund Raising: Work, Wealth, and Wisdom."

In spite of all the work needed to write a grant proposal, say these experts, remember that the proposal counts for only 10 percent of your chances of getting the grant. Find out what your best "match" in the funding community is by meeting in small groups with funders from your area. Then get a commitment of interest from the funder before you put pen to paper.

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More Funding Tips

One place to start looking for government money is with the "Nonprofit Gateway," http://www.nonprofit.gov, a website with information on dozens of federal grants. The Bureau of Land Management, for instance, funds cultural resource management projects. The National Park Service and Fish and Wildlife Service offers 10 grant programs for such purposes as wildlife restoration and rivers and trails. This notice was found in the Delaware River Greenway News, a project of the Delaware River Greenway and the Heritage Conservancy in Doylestown (not to be confused with the Delaware & Raritan Greenway on Mercer Street). For information call 215-345-7020.

The partnership is itself a grant giver: through the support of the William Penn Foundation it gave more than $37,000 for Delaware River Watershed Initiative Demonstration Grants. Among them is one to Allentown Borough for kiosks providing watershed-based environmental education. The Friends of the Delaware Canal, a group based in New Hope, received a grant to help find solutions to canal flooding.

In the New Jersey Grants Guide is this list of useful links:

Internet Prospector with links and reports: http://www.plains.uwyo.edu/~prospect.

Philanthropy Journal, on online newsletter with a free weekly e-mail newsletter at http://www.philanthropy-journal.org.

The Foundation Center, a nonprofit organization with a variety of information on grantmakers and links to home pages: http://www.fdncenter.org.

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New Banking Regs

Companies filing prospectuses with the Securities and Exchange Commission need to learn how to describe the investment risks in plain-spoken English, says David Cornish. "Historically SEC filings are written in accountants' or legal jargonese," says Cornish. "The SEC has now required that certain parts of the filings, specifically statements about risk, be written in plain English. It should be done in standard speaking language, where you're not using technical or legal terms so that anybody who is not of a technical background can pick a document and understand the risks associated with that transactions." This could be effective October 1.

Cornish, a partner in charge of Arthur Anderson's New Jersey community banking practice, in Roseland, is a speaker at New Jersey Bankers Association program on Friday, June 26, at 9 a.m. at the Summit Bank Training Center in Jamesburg. Call 609-924-5550. The program, "Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging, SFAs No. 131 and SEC Activity Update," features talks by Kevin Cummings of KPMG Peat Marwick, Michael Mullarkey, manager of accounting policy and research with Summit Bank, and Dennis Spinelli, chairman of the NJBA's financial reporting and taxing committee.

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Sponsors for Golf

The Mercer County Chamber Golf & Tennis Classic is taking sponsorships for the Golf & Tennis Classic on Monday, July 20, at Mercer Oaks and the Mercer County Outdoor Tennis Center, both part of the county park system that spans Village Road and Old Trenton Road. Your firm can sponsor a hole and field a golf foursome for $850, or enter two tennis players and sponsor a court for $300. On the other end of the contribution and participation scale, buy a ticket to the awards reception, to be held at the Boat House on the lake, for $50.

Should you be lucky enough to get a hole-in-one you can choose the auto of your choice from six dealers: Lawrence Lexus, Princeton BMW, Lawrence Lincoln Mercury, Lawrence Toyota, Princeton Motorsport, or Princeton's Nassau Conover Ford Lincoln Mercury Audi. While you contemplate your choice, should you be so lucky, remember that they've put a $50,000 limit on the value of the prize auto.

Major sponsors include Summit, Commerce, PNC, and First Union banks, plus Trap Rock Industries and St. Francis Medical Center. Lunch and the awards reception are included in the basic fees of $175 for golf and $100 for tennis. Call 609-393-4143.

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Corporate Angels

The Mercer County Bar Association's community projects committee will distribute more than 120 fans to senior citizens living at or near the poverty level. This year, twice as many fans are being given out, in part due to the contribution of Hamilton K-Mart, which is offering fans at a discounted price. For more information, call 609-585-6200.

The Mercer County Community College Foundation has raised more than $200,000 in scholarship money for its students. This exceeds its original goal of $125,000. Proceeds from this year's March 7 dinner dance yielded a lion's share of the money.

The Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation, based at 35 Park Place, gave a $150,000 grant to Westminster Choir College.


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