Corrections or additions?

These articles were prepared for the

May 2, 2001 edition of U.S. 1 Newspaper. All rights reserved.

On the Move

Synthon Chiragenics, 7 Deer Park Drive, Monmouth

Junction 08852. Scott E. Coleridge, president & CEO. 732-274-0037;

fax, 732-274-0501. Home page: www.synthoncorp.com

Rawle Hollingsworth, the founder of scientific director of Synthon,

has managed to commercialize a carbohydrate-based chiral technology

platform for the development of a new class of pharmaceuticals that

might help treat auto-immune diseases and cancer. The technology,

which lets researchers inhibit the activity of the enzyme PNP, is

being used in research on a lymphoma treatment now in clinical trials.

The pharmaceutical company conducting these trials has not been

disclosed.

The chirality of a molecule is important to drug development.

Molecules

used to develop therapeutic drugs typically form in non-chiral, mirror

images of themselves. Each mirror image can react very differently

in the body. For example, one molecule may show a desired therapeutic

effect, but its mirror image may cause significant, undesirable side

effects.

Because the FDA requires that the efficacy and safety of each mirror

image must be proved before a drug can be marketed, drug development

companies must go through the costly process of developing batches

of chiral molecules. Synthon has technologies to simplify the process

and decrease the cost. It has shown it can do this in drugs for

cholesterol

reduction, central nervous system disorders (anti-depressants),

antibiotics,

muscle relaxants, and anti-virals.

Preparing molecules to deter PNP activity might actually help to

create

a new drug development platform. Until now, this molecular platform

has stumped researchers, because it has three contiguous chiral

centers,

says Scott E. Coleridge, the CEO. "As we are able to decode the

genetic basis for disease," says Coleridge, "chiral chemistry

advances will provide the ability to create the molecules needed to

develop new types of target therapies."

Hollingsworth, a professor at Michigan State University, moved the

company from Michigan to New Jersey to get better access to current

and potential clients. (U.S. 1, May 24, 2000).

Synthon is a fine chemicals and custom synthesis company that can

produce high purity chiral intermediates for the pharmaceutical and

biotechnology industries. An estimated 60 to 70 percent of all drugs

over the next five years will be chiral, and the chiral chemicals

market for pharmaceuticals is expected to exceed $5 billion by 2003.

Sarnoff Corporation, 201 Washington Road, CN 5300,

Princeton 08543-5300. James E. Carnes, president & CEO. 609-734-2000;

fax, 609-734-2040. Home page: www.sarnoff.com

Sarnoff has announced a new miniature camera that could be inexpensive

enough for the wide use in automotive and surveillance applications.

The BLINC digital camera, just one inch square, can be made from the

mass market CMOS chips that also make cell phones — yet it can

transmit high quality video images under poor light conditions. It

will be inexpensive, about the price of a computer mouse, and will

require much less power than its competitors.

Sarnoff is looking for partners to form its own company to manufacture

CMOS imagers — and possibly the miniature cameras.

Medarex (MEDX), 707 State Road, Princeton Gateway,

Suite 206, Princeton 08540. Donald L. Drakeman, president.

609-430-2880;

fax, 609-430-2850. Home page: www.medarex.com

Neuro Therapeutics has signed on to use Medarex’s HuMAb-Mouse

technology

to develop fully human antibody therapeutics for central nervous

system

disorders. Both companies will share equally in the preclinical and

clinical development and commercialization of any products that

result.

Privately held, NeuroTherapeutics began at the University of British

Columbia and is located in Vancouver.

NexMed Inc. (NEXM), 350 Corporate Boulevard,

Robbinsville

08691. Joseph Mo, CEO. 609-208-9688; fax, 609-208-1868. Home page:

www.nexmed.com

NexMed released Phase I clinical trial data on Femprox cream treatment

for female sexual arousal disorder. The study of 64 healthy women

in Miami, from ages 21 to 60, showed that Femprox was safe and well

tolerated at all doses. Femprox is designed to improve vaginal

secretions

and increase sexual arousal and pleasure during intercourse. Phase

II proof of concept studies will involve 100 patients at 11 sites.

A-1 Limousine, 2 Emmons Drive, Princeton

08540-9923.

Michael Starr, CEO. 609-951-0070; fax, 609-951-9330. Home page:

www.a1limo.com

A-1 Limousine has bought Elite Limousine, based in Allentown,

Pennsylvania.

Elite is the largest ground transportation company in the Lehigh

Valley,

and this will be the third location for A-1. The expansion will add

50 more vehicles for a total of 300 limousines, sedans, vans, and

motor coaches. A-1, which also has a dispatch center in Bound Brook,

will now go to five airports: Newark, LaGuardia, JFK, Philadelphia,

and Lehigh Valley. As a subsidiary, Elite will keep its name,

management,

and staff.

The company was founded by president and CEO Michael Starr in 1964,

and started at an Arco gas station located on Route 1.

Princeton eCom Corporation, 650 College Road East,

Princeton 08540. Curt Welling, CEO. 609-606-3000; fax, 609-606-3297.

Home page: www.princetonecom.com

New Century Equity Holdings Corp. and Mellon Ventures led $20 million

in convertible debt financing for the provider of electronic billing

and payment services. Other investors were SG Capital Partners (the

merchant banking affiliate of Societe Generale), Bottomline

Technologies,

Terra Lycos Ventures, and BT Investment Partners.

"This is a strong endorsement of Princeton eCom’s business, its

business model, and its prospects by our current investors," says

Curt Welling, Princeton eCom’s CEO. Welling has also announced a deal

to process electronic payments for Pennsylvania-based NCO Group Inc.,

the largest provider of accounts receivable collection services in

the world.

SimStar Internet Solutions, 1 Airport Place,

Princeton

08540. David Reim, president. 609-252-9741; fax, 609-252-1425. Home

page: www.simstar.com

Catterton Partners has completed a $10 million private equity minority

investment in the healthcare E-business solution firm. "The

investment

is a validation of Simstar’s historic success and our ability to

continue

to redefine the pharmaceutical E-marketing space," says David

Reim, president of Simstar. "Unlike many other companies that

receive outside investment, Simstar has been profitable every year

since inception. We are using these funds to build on our six years

of E-pharma innovation and leadership and capitalize on a large market

opportunity."

Based in Greenwich, Connecticut, Catterton Partners works in the

consumer

products and services space and has invested in FloorGraphics (at

Vaughn Drive) and Naviant, among others (www.cpequity.com). Simstar

offers strategy, development, and servicing of E-business solutions

for the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries

T/MAC Inc., 100 Jersey Avenue, Building D-6, New

Brunswick 08901. Marvin Wurtzelman, president. 732-247-0022; fax,

732-247-4622. Home page: www.tmacinc.com

Marvin Wurtzelman’s technology company has been named regional prime

contractor of the year for the region that includes New Jersey, New

York, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. He will receive the

award on Wednesday, May 2, and will enter the national competition.

Wurtzelman’s company designs and manufacturers custom radio frequency

and microwave amplifiers. An alumnus of the SBDC incubator on Jersey

Avenue, it was named by Deloitte & Touche as one of the 500 fastest

growing technology companies in the nation.

Total Research Corp. (TOTL), 5 Independence Way,

Princeton Corporate Center 4th floor, Box 5305, Princeton 08543-5305.

Albert A. Angrisani, president and CEO. 609-520-9100; fax,

609-987-8839.

Home page: www.totalres.com

A new product from Total Research, Customer Profitability Management,

links customer loyalty and customer profitability by using information

technology and economic analysis. With CPM, market research is planned

so that financial analysts will be able to determine the cost and

profitability of customer relationships. "CPM’s economic analysis

lets senior management know if they do X, then Y will be the

return,"

says James M. Salter, senior vice president of Total Research.


Next Story


Corrections or additions?


This page is published by PrincetonInfo.com

— the web site for U.S. 1 Newspaper in Princeton, New Jersey.

Facebook Comments