Airport Shuffle

Princeton’s Upgrades

Sports for Charity

Corporate Angels

Donate Please

Corrections or additions?

These articles were published in U.S. 1 Newspaper on August 11, 1999. All rights reserved.

Mercer’s Careers

"Career development" is the

mantra

at Mercer County Community College, where several new professional

training classes and programs have been added to the fall line-up.

It’s now possible to get a certificate for "HTML Author,"

"Web Administrator," and "Web Developer" within a

few weeks time. For those who want to beef up technical skills, the

courses are a bargain; for employers who need to train staff for the

21st century, they are a steal.

The Web Administrator Certificate program, a 10-session evening class

beginning on Tuesday, September 14, requires a bachelors in computer

science as a prerequisite. Students learn to understand Internet

working

design, trace IP routing, configure Web servers in NT and Unix, and

address Web-related security issues. Cost: $600.

The Web Developer Certificate, a 16-session course offered in the

evenings beginning Tuesday, October 19, only requires an associates

degree in computer science. Students learn to plan Internet and

Intranet

applications, create basic PERL programs, process HTML forms, create

basic Javascript and Java programs. Cost: $960

The HTML Author Certificate is a 10-session course for anyone who

has basic Windows 95 Internet-user knowledge. Students learn the

basics

of developing HTML documents and creating Web pages using frames and

tables. Evening classes begin Thursday, September 30. Cost: $540.

The new "Medical Practice Management" a four-course program

offered in conjunction with the Medical Society of New Jersey, is

designed to help office managers learn new management techniques,

financial issues, regulatory compliance, and information technology.

Classes begin on Wednesday, September 15. Cost per course: $390. The

"Certificate in Clinical Research and Drug Development," a

four-course training program for research assistants, research

associates,

or data coordinators in the pharmaceutical field, begins this fall

as well.

For those interested in the hospitality field, there is a

"Waitstaff

Training" course, and it’s now possible for Mercer County

residents

to earn a four-year bachelors degree in hotel, restaurant and

institution

management from the University of Delaware through courses at MCCC

campuses and distance learning programs. On the travel side, MCCC

offers "Professional Tour Planning and Escorting" and

"Destination

Specialist — Western Europe."

A 56-hour "Certified Assisted Living Administrator" exam

preparation

course begins on Tuesday, October 26, and the "Substitute Teacher

Institute," another new education program, begins on Monday,

August

23.

MCCC’s Division of Corporate and Community Programs offers hundreds

of classes for professional and personal development and will soon

be expanding into a $6.8 million building under construction on the

West Windsor campus. For information call 609-586-9446. For a complete

list of credit and non-credit courses go to http://www.mccc.edu.

Top Of Page
Airport Shuffle

They add two new flights and take away three. That

pretty

much sums up the story of Eastwind Airlines since it took off at

Trenton-Mercer

Airport four years ago. The Greensboro, North Carolina-based airline

recently dropped the Pittsburgh and St. Petersburg destinations, only

shortly after adding them, and the popular Boston flight was nixed

as well. A week later the buzz surrounding the "beeline"

intensified

when several members of Eastwind’s senior management were booted by

parent company U.M. Holdings in Haddonfield.

On July 29 Eastwind announced that president and CEO Terry V. Hallcom

and vice presidents Scott Glasser and Michael Kopay were relieved

of their duties "effective immediately." Nearly 60 of 250

employees were laid off and two of the company’s five Boeing 737s

were grounded. Virginia-based aviation consultants Mort Beyer & Agnew

are stepping in to restructure the carrier.

In its hey-day as a commuter airline, Eastwind offered daily

connections

from Trenton Mercer Airport to Boston, Washington, Greensboro,

Orlando,

St. Petersburg, Pittsburgh, and Philadelphia. But the airline

reportedly

lost $29 million since 1995 and owes back rent on the airport to

Mercer

County, and on two of the company’s five Boeing 737s. Financial woes

were only part of the problem; earlier this year customers started

complaining about double billing, horrible delays, and Eastwind even

saw a few incidents of passenger "flight rage."

In an attempt to create additional revenue, two of Eastwind’s fleet

of five are now chartered out to tour companies. That leaves only

three planes in the air, traveling to Greensboro, Trenton, and

Orlando.

Commuter schedules for the three cities are still the same: a Boeing

737 leaves Trenton-Mercer Airport at 7:05 a.m. and lands in

Greensboro,

North Carolina, at 9:05 a.m. The evening flight leaves Trenton at

7:45 p.m. The direct to Orlando leaves Trenton at 7:50 a.m. and

arrives

at 11:05 a.m. One way fares are as low as $59 and $79 with advance

purchase.

While Eastwind flights are being scaled back, ShuttleAmerica has been

adding flights to its schedule, with prices as low as $29. Norfolk,

Buffalo, and Wilmington are among the destinations.

For Eastwind, call 800-644-3592 (http://www.eastwindairlines.com).

For Shuttle America, call 860-386-4200 or

http://www.shuttleamerica.com.

Top Of Page
Princeton’s Upgrades

Princeton Airport on Route 206 is getting a major

facelift.

Over the next nine months, a new runway, 500 feet longer and 15 feet

wider than the existing one, is being built 250 feet north of the

existing runway, on 50 acres of land that the airport purchased in

January for $1.7 million. Still, no big planes in sight. The new

runway

merely brings the 90-year-old airport up to current FAA standards

for safety.

Contractors are currently grading the land for work on the new runway,

which will measure 3,500 feet long by 75 feet wide and include a newer

and safer lighting system. The existing runway will become a full

length taxiway, something the airport never had. The project, costing

roughly $4.5 million, is funded in part by federal block grants from

the Federal Aviation Administration and the Division of Aeronautics.

Construction is scheduled to be done some time in the spring of 2000,

but at no point, says a spokesperson, will the airport actually be

closed.

Top Of Page
Sports for Charity

A charity sports match can raise both money and morale.

For instance, the WPST radio station regularly fields an "All

Star" softball team for such charity challenges. A Washington

Road-based software company, Cylogix Inc., picked up the challenge

and will play the WPST/7-11 team on Thursday, August 12, at 5:30 p.m.,

at the West Windsor-Plainsboro High School Field. Proceeds will

benefit

the Princeton Junction Volunteer Fire Company. Call Judy Jones

at 609-750-5118 for information.

Here’s what it would involve: your office must procure the field,

set up a 50/50 raffle or a silent auction, and arrange to sell

refreshments.

Your company’s team members seek pledges for hits and runs. Call

Gabrielle

Vaughn, mid-day host at WPST, to sign up for a slot. Most of this

season’s dates are taken, so try now for next year.

WPST brings the sound system, provides free publicity (two dozen

announcements

of the game), and gives away prizes and merchandise to those

attending.

Someone from WPST announces the lineup, calls the game, and does a

live post-game report on the station announcing the amount of money

your company has raised.

The website at http://www.wpst.com carries schedules,

results, and photos of each game. future games include one with

Integra

Life Sciences on Wednesday, August 18, to benefit the National Burn

Victims Foundation; Withum Smith & Brown on Thursday, September 9,

to benefit the Princeton Youth Fund, and Bloomberg Financial on

Wednesday,

September 15, to benefit a literacy charity, Everybody Wins.

"I never would have put myself on a softball team, but we are

just having a good time," says Vaughn. The daughter of a

stockbroker

in Maplewood, she graduated in 1997 from Bryn Mawr College, a woman’s

college that eschews such commercial majors as communications or media

studies. Instead, she majored in English and something called Growth

and Structure of Cities, and now in her mid-day time slot she does

a retro cafe. "I listened to ‘PST at Bryn Mawr," says Vaughn,

"and I have fallen into this with a real passion."

Last year the radio station raised more than $25,000 for 18 charities.

One recent game with the team from Princeton University’s molecular

biology department, named the Dominant Lethals, raised $3,200 for

the American Cancer Society. "This year we are already up to

$15,000

and have played only six games, and are extending our season through

October," says Vaughn.

Top Of Page
Corporate Angels

<B>Hewlett-Packard has awarded an equipment grant

of $22,199 to Community Options to implement its national information

technology plan. The donated equipment will be used at its five New

Jersey offices, to strengthen its existing employment programs for

people with disabilities receiving support in New Jersey as well as

its national fundraising efforts (http://www.comop.org).

J. Seward Johnson Sr. Charitable Trust has made a $20,000

donation to HiTOPS (Health Interested Teens’ Own Program on Sexuality)

for its core program, educational outreach and clinical care for

teenagers.

Comcast’s New Jersey cable systems was awarded the 1999

Media Award by the New Jersey affiliate of the Literacy Volunteers

of America (LVA). Over the past year, Comcast’s New Jersey cable

systems

have contributed more than $12,000 in grants to LVA’s community

affiliates

around the state.

The Princeton Regional Scholarship Foundation has

announced

first year college scholarship awards to 16 graduates of Princeton

Regional High School for study at 14 colleges this fall. The

foundation

funds its awards from current contributions through an annual direct

mail campaign and from limited endowment income.

The 1998-’99 campaign, the most successful in more than a decade and

augmented by generous local foundation and corporate gifts, marked

the first step in the Foundation’s attempt to endow a larger number

of scholarships. Individuals or institutions interested in working

with or contributing to the foundation may contact Judy Leopold

at 609-924-7398.

A massive donation effort on the part of community businesses

has helped the renovation of the Trenton-based Wilson Neighborhood

Center, which had original fixtures dating back 30 years. George

Donegan of Syska & Hennessy, the project manager and chief plumbing

designer of the center, coordinated the effort, after hearing

disappointing

reports about the project’s shrinking budget from architect Peter

Lokhammer. Kohler Company donated fixtures; Tennant Associates,

flush valves, traps and insulation kits; Symmons, faucets, Wheelock

Inc., fire alarm devices. Maloney & Curcio came through with a

drinking

fountain, and Dolan & Traynor with floor drains.

Top Of Page
Donate Please

Calling all paving contractors, calling nearly everybody

else in the construction business. The New Jersey Alliance for Action,

the 25-year-old statewide nonpartisan nonprofit that concerns itself

with infrastructure and economic development, solicits ads for the

program book for its 25th anniversary celebration. It will be

Wednesday,

October 20, at 5:30 p.m. at the New Brunswick Hyatt. The ads range

from $400 to $700, and the dinner costs $200. Call 732-225-1180.

The alliance seeks to help community organizations find state and

federal financing, permitting, and regulatory approvals for various

projects. The list of alliance members tells the story: contractors

of all kinds, engineers, materials dealers, trades, and various

chambers

of commerce. For instance, everyone connected with roads is a member,

from the asphalt pavers and the crushed stone association to the mixed

concrete association and the American Concrete Institute.

All those who attend the dinner will get a copy of a history of the

alliance written by Muriel Smith and see an NJN documentary

on the group.

Angelwish, a not-for-profit charitable organization that

grants "wishes" and provides need for children living with

HIV/AIDS in the NJ/NY area, needs a website designer to offer a bid

on website design and construction for a secured site. It should be

consistent with the marketing approach to reach 18 to 34 year-old

people, and visitors should be able to 1.) E-mail a response saying

they can provide that wish, 2.) purchase an item through an online

affiliates (requires frame and SSL capacity), and 3.) refer the wish

to a friend through a pop-up window. E-mail

shimul.mehta@pwcglobal.com

or call 973-564-2212.


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