In December a medical education firm, Scinexa, moved from Princeton Meadows Office Center to join ArcMesa Educators LLC on Route 33 in Monroe, and it took that name. The 12-year-old firm has 25 employees.

ArcMesa, which derives its revenue from tuition, offers continuing education to 18 types of professionals, starting with healthcare but also including funeral professionals, cosmetologists, barbers, and a dozen other allied health areas.

SciNexa, in contrast, was more involved in commercially sponsored programs. It was started by Michael Hennessy and Tighe Blazier. Blazier is now general manager of the combined firms. Hennessy also founded Intellisphere, which publishes Internet guides for physicians, such as MD NetGuide, provides medical education (www.cmediscovery.com), and produces television programs.

“We combined forces,” says Ken Meyer, who founded ArcMesa Educators and is now executive vice president of the combined firms. “It made a lot of sense for both organizations. We have an online technology and expertise, and they have done a good job in a short period of time.”

ArcMesa has been providing online continuing education for 10 years. “We are one of the first organizations to actually present a comprehensive online CME vehicle to the AMA back in 1994-’95,” says Meyer. “We built an application that manages the online and traditional sales and are beginning to share the application to universities, associations, and professional publications.”

Baylor University’s college of dentistry will begin sharing content across the network this year, and ArcMesa now has a turnkey solution for online CME for other dental colleges. “By the end of the year, 2007, most of the fence sitters among the dental schools will realize the value of our offering and be part of it, one way or another,” he predicts. “We are also working with medical schools to build a national medical network and share our application as well.”

Meyer grew up in Middletown, where his father was an entrepreneur, and graduated from the University of South Florida in 1982. At Unisys he was in charge of presentation visual aids for one and two star generals at Fort Monmouth, and then he went out on his own, founding the firm in 1994.

ArcMesa Educators/SciNexa, 951 Route 33 West, Monroe 08831; 609-630-6100; fax, 609-630-6110. Tighe Blazier, general manager. www.arcmesa.com.

Name Change

For GfK/NOP

A State Road building next to Princeton Airport is the home of a healthcare division in one of the top five market research firms in the world. The sign out front says GfK/NOP but soon it will change, eliminating NOP from the name, though the personnel and the mission will not change. The change represents the last stage of the company’s acquisition by the GfK Group, headquartered in Nuremburg, Germany.

Princeton hosts two of GfK’s five divisions here, GfK Custom Research North America on the first floor, and healthcare, represented by GfK Market Measures on the second floor. (Other healthcare companies are in Pennsylvania.)

The 140 workers in GfK Custom Research North America can trace their roots to a firm founded in Princeton in 1969, Response Analysis, which — in turn — has its roots in the Gallup firm. Response Analysis focused on banking, insurance, investments, telecommunications, and information technology. It was bought by Roper Starch, then by NOP, then by United News and Media, and finally by the German company. The headquarters is in New York. Custom Research North America retains NOP North America as a legal entity, according to a spokesperson.

The sister company, Market Measures, is dedicated to healthcare market research and has 40 workers.

GfK made its reputation from measuring audience ratings for German television. It has more than 130 subsidiaries and affiliates in over 70 countries, and its other divisions are retail and technology, consumer tracking, and media.

GfK Market Measures, 1060 State Road, Box 158, Princeton 08542-0158; 609-683-6100; fax, 609-683-6211. Barry Zimmerman, CEO. www.gfkushc.com.

GfK Custom Research North America, 1060 State Road, Princeton 08540; 609-683-6100; fax, 609-683-6211. Debra Pruent, COO. www.gfkamerica.com

Crosstown Move

Glenn Long & Associates Inc., 4813 Bloomingdale Drive, Hillsborough 08844. 908-874-3653. Glenn L. Long, president. E-mail: Glennlong@gl-asc.com

Glenn Long has one foot in each camp of medical communications — print and digital technology. In November he moved his office from Research Park to a home office but continues to sell two kinds of communications programs — a video series and an old-fashioned newsletter.

The son of a computer programmer and a teacher, he graduated from Rutgers in 1972 and worked as a pharmaceutical sale representative before moving to the supplier side, founding his own firm in 1990. His clients include Merck, Wyeth, and Centocor (a J&J company).

Long’s video series, produced by Alan Paley of Lawrenceville-based APB Communications, is a digital version of “grand rounds,” filmed in a studio with a panel of physicians and then preserved on CD, DVD, or on the web. Viewers watch as the physicians ponder a case study, going through the diagnostic process in hopes of getting the right answer. For this exercise, the process is what counts. “If they don’t get the answer right, the presenter lets them know and there is a summary,” says Long. “The vast majority they get right, unless the case is very exotic.

Developing each video costs about $110,000, plus distribution costs, underwritten by the pharmaceutical firms — who may or may not see their drugs prescribed. Only balanced presentations can be accredited as continuing medical education exercises. “It could be just promotional, but that would come out of the marketing budget, as opposed to the continuing education budget,” says Long. Each CD has one case and clients generally underwrite a series of three or four per year.

Long also sells a newsletter series called New Developments, typically underwritten by a pharmaceutical company and distributed to physicians. Centocor’s version, featuring its product for rheumatoid arthritis, has been published for five years.

“For the foreseeable future, older physicians have a certain comfort level with something they hold in their hand,” says Long. “There will always be a market for a print format. but we recognize the evolution of technology, so we have our newsletter on the website.”

Healthcare Publishing

HMP Communications, 83 General Warren Boulevard, Suite 100, Malvern 19355; 610-560-0500; fax, 610-560-0501. Peter Norris, president and CEO. Home page: www.hmpcommunications.com

At the end of December a medical publishing company moved from 4365 Route 1 South to its headquarters in Malvern, Pennsylvania. Among the 12 journals that it publishes are Clinical Geriatrics and Annals of Long Term Care. The editors of these publications are working from their homes.

“We didn’t need that much space,” says Peter Norris, president and CEO of HMP, which bought the two journals from Multimedia Healthcare. Norris thinks the journals websites do not “cannibalize” advertising from the print version. “The websites enhance our content,” he says, though he notes that the transition from print to electronic is a “challenging” business model.

HMP bought Michael Hennessy’s Multimedia Healthcare/Freedom in August, 2004. HMP is owned by a New York City-based venture capital group, and at that time it had an overall circulation of about 350,000 readers.

Management Moves

Lawrenceville Main Street, 17 Phillips Avenue, Lawrenceville 08648; 609-219-9300; fax, 609-219-9301. Carla Cheifetz, executive director. www.lawrencevillemainstreet.com

On January 8 Carla Cheifetz took over as the new executive director at Lawrenceville Main Street. She replaces Ann Garwig, who retired after 10 years.

A graduate of Johnson and Wales University in Rhode Island, with a degree in food service management, Cheifetz has held management positions in sales and catering at several hotels in Maryland and Connecticut, including Holiday Inn, Ramada, and Sheraton.

At Sovereign Bank she was assistant vice president for marketing and sales promotions/programs. She was president of the Rotary Club for five years and is active in other community activities.

Sovereign Bank Arena, 550 South Broad Street, Trenton 08611; 609-656-3200; fax, 609-656-3201. Home page: www.sovereignbank-arena.com

Jeff Schumacher is the new general manager at Trenton’s 10,000-seat arena, replacing Eric J. Cuthbertson. Schumacher graduated from Salisbury University and his most recent job was managing the arena in Lewiston, Maine. He has also managed an arena in Texas, directed marketing for the Riverfront Coliseum in Cincinnati, promoted the Ringling Brothers circus, and directed soccer operations for two professional teams in Philadelphia.

New in Town

Focal Learning Center, 12 Stults Road, Suite 105, Dayton 08810; 732-230-2415. Rupa Roy and Anju Bali, partners. Home page: www.focallearning.com

Two teachers, one with a master’s degree in language arts and the other with a master’s degree in mathematics, have opened Focal Learning Center, a coaching and tutoring center providing academic enrichment programs for K-12 students.

Anju Bali and Rupa Roy aim to “nurture individual excellence,” according to a press release by providing both small group enrichment sessions and free practice sessions to strengthen the skills learned.

The center also has a morning Montessori program for preschoolers.

Facebook Comments