Startup Device Rep

Crosstown Move, And New Name

Expansions

Leaving Town

Management Moves

Contracts Awarded

Crime Watch

Deaths

Corrections or additions?

This article by Barbara Fox was prepared for the December 22, 2004 edition of U.S. 1 Newspaper. All rights reserved.

Life in the Fast Lane

American Bank Note Holographics (ABNH), is moving from two locations (58,000 square feet in Elmsford, New York, and 30,000 feet in Huntingdon Valley, Pennsylvania) to 134,000 square feet at 2 Applegate Drive in Robbinsville, taking over the building constructed by Matrix for the now-departed McLean Engineering.

Virtually every credit card company puts ABNH’s holograms on its transaction cards. ABNH, a public firm, also makes holograms for identity documents, documents of value, pharmaceuticals, and other consumer and industrial products.

CEO Kenneth Traub, a 1983 Emory graduate with a law degree from Harvard, had co-founded Voxware, now located on Franklin Corner Road. He expects to move into the Robbinsville facility in May. He is hiring administration positions (including a quality manager, marketing, sales, payables and receivables clerks, and administrative assistants) plus production positions (embossing operators, metalizers, and printing press operators). The state has promised funding in the form of Business Incentive Employment Grants.

John Schulze of Woodbridge-based Schulze Organization found the space and negotiated a sublease for 14 years with options to renew or purchase. Grubb & Ellis represented the landlord, WP Carey, which has this building as one of four in a sale/leaseback package.

Traub was also represented in the negotiations for real estate and with the NJEDA by Windels Marx as well as by New York-based Fulbright and Jaworski. Art Blick from Northwestern Mutual has the firm’s insurance and benefits business, and Jeff Perlman of Borden Perlman is the agent for the property and casualty insurance. The move will cost $5 million, and ABNH is putting an additional $7 million into the building and new equipment.

American Bank Note Holographics Inc., 399 Executive Boulevard, Elmsford NY 10523. Moving to 2 Applegate Drive, Robbinsville 08691. Kenneth Traub, CEO. 914-593-0809; fax, 914-592-4469. Home page: www.abnh.com

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Startup Device Rep

Jim Ramirez has opened a business, Innovar, to sell custom-made engineered components for medical devices. “My company, Automatic Switch, decided to give up the business unit I was running, engineering custom-made components,” says Ramirez. “So I am dealing with the same components and Automatic Switch is one of my clients.”

“We are able to hold inventory at the manufacturer for our customers and insure product will be delivered on time,” says Ramirez, citing the “just in time” delivery system and “kanban” lean manufacturing system as vital to his firm’s success. Kanban is a manufacturing strategy innovated by the Japanese in which parts are produced or delivered only as needed. “We link the inventory to the source, and replenishment is automatic.” His clients could include Stryker, Siemens Medical, and De-Puy (a division of J&J). His competitors are other manufacturer’s reps.

Ramirez tells a story that is typical of the American dream. He grew up in San Salvador, where his father was an accountant, and came to the United States to put himself through the New Jersey Institute of Technology, graduating in 1993 with a degree in mechanical engineering. He took courses in engineering management at NJIT then earned his master’s degree from Rutgers in an executive MBA program.

Ramirez ran a business unit with $25 million in sales and also did engineering and new product development for Florham Park-based Automatic Switch, a division of Emerson Electric. That company sent him the MBA, and in that cohort group he met his future wife, Carla Benedito, a pharmacist and a native of Portugal who does global marketing at a major pharmaceutical firm. They are getting married next year in Beja, Portugal.

“Our cultural background is similar, and we had the same adjustment period and similar views on the opportunities that this country has to offer,” he says. “I learned from my parents that to follow your dream, you have to go out there and do the best you can. Sometimes you have the ups and downs of a business cycle, but you have to be dedicated and follow through.”

Innovar, which operates for now out of Ramirez’s Canal Pointe home, can procure components made with injection molding, hydroforming, micromachining, microcoiling, or stamping. Other technologies available include impact extrusion, aluminum die casting, investment casting, metal spinning, laser processing and welding, glass-to-metal seals, extrusion, forging, zinc die casting, or joining and assembling in clean rooms.

“We work with manufacturers from the development stage in quantities of 1 to 10 or 1 to 100, and then in production, in quantities of 5,000 to 100,000,” he says. “These items are used to apply medicine without breaking the skin, as heartbeat monitors, oncology products, or electronic devices to monitor a specific condition.” Other targeted areas are neurological and interventional vascular systems, aerospace and military, process automation, photonics, electronics and PC boards, and the battery and power source industry.

Ramirez is a successful immigrant, but he says he earned his best business lesson in San Salvador from his fourth grade teacher who clamped down at just the right time. “I had decided to hang around with the wrong crowd,” he remembers. “My grades were not up to the level they needed to be and I got the biggest scare of my life when I thought I was going to be left behind. I remember having conversations with my fourth grade teacher and my parents. It made me realize that going to school is a good thing and if I was going to do well I needed to work hard.”

Innovar, 104 Heritage Boulevard, Suite 12, Princeton 08540. Jim Ramirez, owner. 973-493-7615; fax, 866-219-2198. Home page: www.innovarusa.com

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Crosstown Move, And New Name

On December 17 Ford Farewell Mills and Gatsch vacated the Carnegie Center. After four years in a temporary sublease it moved to the vintage chemical science building, built in 1916, on Princeton University’s Forrestal Campus (the Route 1 North campus that is also occupied by the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory). And when the architects unpacked, they took a new name: Farewell Mills Gatsch Architects LLC.

The 30-year-old practice was founded by Jerry Ford and the late Bill Short, and for the first time neither of the original partners is working here. (Ford now has a boutique firm, Ford 3 Architects, at 32 Nassau Street.) The partners are Michael Farewell, James A. Gatsch, Michael J. Mills, Michael Schnoering, and Lorine Murray-Mechini.

According to spokesman Larry Capo of FMG, “200 Forrestal Road is perfect for us.” The practice traditionally has been housed in historic buildings, such as its former headquarters on Mapleton Road. “Half of our business is historic preservation work. It also afforded us the opportunity to do some interesting renovation on the interior that reflects our new design work.”

Of the new materials, fixtures, and systems, many were chosen for their positive effect on indoor air quality and for the fact that they were rapidly renewable materials with a low impact on the environment. The materials include work stations made of wheatboard, acoustic ceiling material with recycled content, linoleum flooring, and low-VOC paint.

FMG went from 11,000 feet at the Carnegie Center to just over 8,500 feet in its new quarters — the third and fourth floors of the 88-year-old brick building. But the plan for the fourth floor makes the space seem larger, Capo says, because it is a “a real attic” that now houses the company’s server, telephone equipment, library, and storage files. “Because we get to do all the filing upstairs it actually increases the working space,” says Capo. “The new space, with 13-foot ceilings feels much more open.”

Michael Farewell, partner in charge of design, went to Yale and has a master’s from Princeton. His current projects include the expansion and renovation of the landmark Westport Country Playhouse in Westport, Connecticut, a new performing arts center at Rowan University in Glassboro, and renovations to the New Jersey State Museum in Trenton.

Current projects for James A. Gatsch, managing partner, are a new campus center for the Pennington School and the renovation of the Middlesex County Courthouse in New Brunswick.

Michael Schnoering, a graduate of the New Jersey Institute of Technology, is working on the Westport Country Playhouse and the arts center at Rowan University.

Lorine Murray-Mechini, a graduate of Penn State, is project manager for the State Museum in Trenton, the campus center at the Pennington School, and an arts addition at the Midland School in North Branch.

Farewell Mills Gatsch Architects LLC, 200 Forrestal Road, Third Floor, Princeton 08540. James A. Gatsch FAIA, managing partner. 609-452-1777; fax, 609-452-7192. Home page: www.fmg-arch.com

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Expansions

Horvath & Giacin, 130 Route 31 North, Suite A, Box 706, Pennington 08534-0706. John A. Horvath CPA, shareholder. 609-737-0300; fax, 609-737-7640.

The accounting practice expanded with a move from 23 Route 31 to Route 130, where it has eight employees.

Yardville National Bancorp (YANB), 4556 South Broad Street, Box 8487, Trenton 08650-8487. Patrick M. Ryan, president and CEO. 609-581-2809; fax, 609-584-5984. Home page: www.yanb.com

Yardville Bank has received approval from the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency to open another branch in Ewing Township in the Mountain View Office Park at 810 Bear Tavern Road. The full service branch, YNB’s 23rd office, is expected to open this month. It will have a drive-up, safe deposit boxes, and an ATM in addition to lobby banking services. The bank has said it will open five new branch offices next year.

“While we value our commercial lending relationships and their contribution to YNB’s growth, we want to provide our business customers with much more than just lending services,” says CEO Patrick Ryan. “By increasing convenient access for our business customers and offering them the products and services they need, we cement those relationships, and that is good for everyone.”

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Leaving Town

Emtech Inc., 817 Eastgate Drive, Mt. Laurel 08054. John Howlett, CEO. 856-235-2121; fax, 856-235-1666. Home page: www.emtechinc.com

Atlanticom Technologies is now known by a different name, Emtech Inc., and has moved from Whitehead Road to Mt. Laurel. Joe Garofalo, president of Atlanticom, is still with the firm.

Established in 1981, Emtec is a systems integrator that provides technology solutions in the areas of enterprise computing, data communications, data access, network design, enterprise backup and storage consolidation, managed services, and staff augmentation.

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Management Moves

Sovereign Bank Arena, 550 South Broad Street, Trenton 08611. Eric Cuthbertson, general manager. 609-656-3200; fax, 609-656-3201. Home page: www.sovereignbank-arena.com

Eric J. Cuthbertson has replaced Michael Scanlon as general manager of the Sovereign Bank Arena. Scanlon moves on to another property owned by Global Spectrum. Fran Rodowicz, who comes from Philadelphia’s Wachovia Complex, is the new assistant general manager.

Cuthbertson has been assistant general manager for two years, and he has also been assistant director of North American tours for Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey and Disney on Ice. “Eric is a tremendous leader with an extensive knowledge of operating facilities, promoting shows and selling tickets. His familiarity with the facility and the community will continue to be a valuable asse,” says COO John Page.

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Contracts Awarded

Barrier Therapeutics Inc. (BTRX), 600 College Road East, Suite 3200, Princeton 08540. Geert Cauwenbergh, CEO. 609-945-1200; fax, 609-945-1212. Home page: www.barriertherapeutics.com

On December 16 the pharmaceutical company announced positive results for a Phase 3 clinical trial for Sebazole, to treat seborrheic dermatitis, a skin irritation that is accompanied by a red, scaly, itchy rash. The active ingredient in this medication is ketoconazole, an antifungal agent, formulated in a waterless gel for once-daily application. By the middle of next year Barrier Therapeutics hopes to file a new drug application for Sebazole.

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Crime Watch

James J. Gosnay took over as CEO of the Community Blood Council on Parkside Avenue in Ewing last March, and he has a big turn-around job on his hands. His predecessor, 46-year-old Patrick Deschenes, has been charged with first degree money laundering and theft by deception, a second degree crime.

Vaughn L. McKoy, director of the Division of Criminal Justice, alleges that Deschenes artificially inflated the purchase price of blood products sold to area hospitals in order to generate and keep more than $640,000 in illegal profits. McKoy says that the owner of Bio-Matter, a Pennsylvania-based blood product supplier, colluded with Deschenes and split the profits.

This scheme allegedly took place from March, 1999 through last February, and Gosnay replaced Deschenes as CEO last March.

“The victims in this scheme were the Community Blood Center, the board of trustees, and the 80 employees of the company,” says Gosnay. “We are one of four independent regional not-for-profit blood centers in the state. We distribute more than 55,000 blood components a year to more than 22 hospitals in central New Jersey and the Delaware Valley,” says Gosnay.

Gosnay, 57, was the son of a chief petty officer in the U.S. Navy. He graduated from St. Joseph’s on the GI Bill. He was a sales representative at Carter Wallace and an account executive in the blood products division at Baxter International, which provided blood collection systems. When he was down-sized by Baxter, he was hired by Deschenes.

Last year the board, headed by retired U.S. Army colonel Frank S. Caprario, installed a independent comptroller who was to report directly to the board. The comptroller, James Lieblang, found some irregularities in the expense accounts, which precipitated the firing of Deschenes. Three days later Gosnay and Lieblang uncovered the alleged scam.

The state grand jury indictment was handed to Mercer County Superior Court Judge Maria Marinari Sypek on December 9, and Deschenes was arrested on December 15. Dan Sweetser of Lozier Lazzaro and Sweetser is representing the blood center, which is pressing charges against the former CEO in an attempt to seek justice and financial retribution.

Community Blood Council of New Jersey Inc., 1410 Parkside Avenue, Ewing 08638-2996. James J. Gosnay, CEO. 609-883-9750; fax, 609-883-9454. Www.communitybloodcouncil.org

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Deaths

Bernarda Bryson Shahn, 101, on December 13. A noted illustrator and author, she was the wife of the late artist Ben Shahn.

Irwin B. Spiegel, 76, on December 20. He was former co-owner of the Herman Spiegel Furniture Store and was an agent with Richardson Commercial Realtors and controller of the Present Company, owned by his wife, Joyce.


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