Art in Town

Art in the Workplace

Campus Arts

Art by the River

Art In Trenton

Area Museums

Corrections or additions?

This article by Pat Summers was prepared for the July 18, 2001

edition of U.S. 1 Newspaper. All rights reserved.

In the Galleries

Wanted: Risk-takers — Those who experiment, those

who don’t repeat themselves. For what field, you ask? Exhibiting

artist.

As juror Frank Rivera, an art critic and teacher, saw it, 10 members

of the Trenton Artists Workshop Association (TAWA) made the cut for

invitational exhibitions at Ellarslie, the Trenton City Museum, this

summer. Bodies of work by five TAWA artists are on view through

Sunday,

July 29. Then, starting August 4, five more members will each have

a room in which to show their stuff.

Angela Barbalace has populated a second floor room with watercolor

paintings of birds and fish, but her "Pink Flamingoes" is

the most unusual of the lot: Standing in what looks like a barren

lunar landscape, they appear almost to be abstract pink and white

shapes, except for their standard flamingo poses. In dark-water shades

on paper that had first been crumpled, "The Deep" suggests

just that: the ocean’s thick opacity — all spotted and

snaggle-toothed

fish to the contrary.

Abstract acrylic paintings by Florence Moonan fill a first floor room

with earth and water tones. Mostly diptychs and triptychs in either

of two series — "Xing" and "Mesa" — the works’

textured surfaces result from layering and rubbing. Some elements,

like red-checkerboard areas, are repeated and varied throughout the

series, all with appealing color juxtapositions.

Figurative, hanging, and floor-based sculpture; a few unique prints;

and a number of woven collagraph prints represent George Olexa’s

varied

entry, occupying a sweep of the first floor. The print collages might

glitter from a distance, but in any case, both colors and layout

patterns

are interestingly used. The strips in "Rush" show nearly

stripped

people, more or less in swimsuits, and if not that, skin. His hanging

"print sculpture" synthesizes much of the surrounding work

in both its materials and motifs.

Barbara Osterman’s abstract watercolors, sometimes involving handmade

paper and colored pencil, suggest both head space and outer space.

"Deep Meditation" seems an apt title for her painting in brown

and mauve-toned cloud suggestions, with three enigmatic yellow lines

painted or scratched on. Hung side by side, "Seeking" and

"Marriage" each suggests a novel’s worth of story via muted

background and a few lines. Which came first: the work or the title:

"Cosmic Energy"?

Ranging from 1974 to the present, Edward Ward’s work is mostly

landscapes,

or tree-scapes, to be precise, as well as a few abstract pieces. His

"Pre-Dawn" series of intaglio prints conveys the coming of

daylight. At first, stars glitter in a dark sky and trees in the

foreground

are barely visible. Then, gradually, light and soft morning colors

become visible. Ward’s acrylic painting, "Tree of Life," is

comparatively angular and stylized — like life, sometimes a

hard-edged

tree?

Secluded in Trenton’s Cadwalader Park, Ellarslie is reached via a

winding road, with parking across from the building. Riotously-hued

summer flowers line the walk to the mansion’s entrance.

— Pat Summers

Ellarslie, Trenton City Museum , Cadwalader Park,

609-989-3632.

"TAWA Invitational," the first of two summer shows featuring

five artists of the Trenton Artists’ Workshop Association. Tuesday

through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Sunday, 1 to 4 p.m. Gallery talks

on the show are presented each Sunday at 2 p.m. Website:

www.Ellarslie.org.

To July 29.

Top Of Page
Art in Town

Cranbury Station Gallery , 28 Palmer Square East,

Princeton,

609-921-0434. Exhibition of prints dating from the 1940s by Princeton

University’s Print Club. On view are prints by commissioned artists

John Taylor Arms, Charles Locke, Leonard Pytlak, John Menihan, and

George Jo Mess. Images include such campus sights as Clio Hall, Dillon

Gym, Stanhope Hall, and Lake Carnegie. Through August.

Historical Society of Princeton , Bainbridge House, 158

Nassau Street, 609-921-6748. "Today’s News, Tomorrow’s

History,"

a show celebrating 18,000 photographs taken by the Princeton Packet’s

photographers and donated to the Historical Society’s permanent

collection.

The collection documents more than 25 years of development, sprawl,

historic preservation, education, celebrations, and festival, with

images of Princeton’s Latino population, Asian Indians, Southeast

Asians, and Chinese Americans.

Marsha Child Contemporary , 220 Alexander Street,

609-497-7330.

Summer group show features gallery artists Georges Mazilu, Andrei

Zadorine, Alexi Raveski, and others. Gallery hours are Tuesday to

Saturday, 10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Show continues through July.

Top Of Page
Art in the Workplace

Gallery at Bristol-Myers Squibb , Route 206, Lawrenceville,

609-252-6275. "Off the Wall," an exhibition of works by 27

sculptors affiliated with Rutgers’ Mason Gross School of the Arts,

curated by Kate Somers. Works installed on the grounds, on the rooftop

garden, and in the gallery. Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and

weekends and holidays, 1 to 5 p.m. To September 9.

NuVisions for Disabled Artists , Educational Testing

Service, Carter and Rosedale roads, 609-921-9000. In the Conant

Hall Art Gallery, 17 disabled artists from the Philadelphia and New

Jersey region present an exhibition of 40 works in all media,

including

oil, pencil, photography, watercolor, and mixed-media. All works are

for sale and proceeds go directly to the artists. Show continues to

August 6.

NuVisions is a nonprofit organization that helps artists with

disabilities

to keep creating art and remain self-sufficient. It was founded in

1984 by artist Kay Schonbach who, after an accident prevented her

from continuing to create the art she knew, found success with a new

medium and new subjects.

"Dealing with illness, especially chronic illness, is so

difficult,"

she says. "Our art lifts us up above the strains and challenges

of everyday life, and frees us in a way that’s almost impossible to

describe with words."

Johnson & Johnson World Headquarters Gallery , New

Brunswick,

732-524-6957. In the New Jersey Artist series, an exhibition of

contemporary

works by Iris Kufert-Rivo that explore art historical icons and pop

culture images. A Jersey City resident, Kufert-Rivo has her MFA from

Bard College and works at P.S. 20 in New York. Free by appointment.

To August 21.

Stark & Stark , 993 Lenox Drive, Building Two,

Lawrenceville,

609-895-7386. "Art & Animals," a group show featuring the

work of Betsy Regan, Susan Hanna MacQueen, Leo Ward, Beatrice Bork,

Naomi Savage, and Lynn Sulpy. Monday to Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. To

September 7.

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Campus Arts

Art Museum, Princeton University , 609-258-3788.

"Recent

Acquisitions" features 30 recent gifts and purchases spanning

two millennia. Works on view range from ancient Chinese Han dynasty

funerary figures, the 1968 collaborative Chinese painting

"Revolution

in Justice," pre-Columbian ceramic figures from the burial island

of Jaina, and George Segal’s "Wall Relief: Torso" (1972);

to September 16.

Also "A Tapestry by Karel van Mander" to August 12.

"Seeing

Double: Copies and Copying in the Arts of China," an exhibition

of Chinese art, to November 4. On extended view in the Bowen Gallery,

Richard Serra’s "Weight and Measure" etchings. Tuesday through

Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Sunday 1 to 5 p.m. Free tours are every

Saturday at 2 p.m.

Firestone Library , Princeton University, 609-258-3184.

"The Light of Ancient Athens: A Photographic Journey by Felix

Bonfils, 1868-1887," an historic series of 42 large-format

photographs

taken in Beirut by the 19th-century French photographer. More than

800 Bonfils photographs were donated to Princeton in 1921 by Rudolf

Ernst Brunnow, professor of Semitic philology. Coordinated by Don

Skemer, the show is guest curated by Andrew Szegedy-Maszak of Wesleyan

University. Open to the public weekdays 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Wednesday

evenings to 8 p.m.; and weekends, noon to 5 p.m. To October 7.

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Art by the River

ABC Gallery , Lambertville Public Library, 6 Lilly Street,

609-397-0275. "Images in Cut Paper," an exhibition of

mixed-media

collages by Dar Hosta. The daughter of an artist and a former English

teacher, Hosta takes her inspiration from children’s illustrators

such as Leo Lionni and Eric Carle as well as from the cut paper works

of Matisse. Monday and Thursday, 1 to 9 p.m.; Tuesday and Wednesday,

10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday 1 to 5 p.m.; and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5

p.m. To August 10.

Artists’ Gallery , 32 Coryell Street, Lambertville,

609-397-4588.

"Point & Counterpoint," a shared show by Gail Bracegirdle

and Ruth Laks. Bracegirdle works from life to create bold,

representational

watercolors. Laks works in oil pastel and pencil to create abstract

works based on visual cues in her environment. Friday, Saturday, and

Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. To August 5.

Artsbridge Gallery , Prallsville Mills, Route 29, Stockton,

609-773-0881. Members’ show features Louis Fatta, winner of the

Artsbridge

2001 Gallery Award for Sculpture, with Neil Berstein, Ingeborg Snipes,

Michael Teters, J.C. Turner, and Robert Virgadamo. Gallery is open

Thursday through Sunday, noon to 6 p.m. To July 29.

Atelier Gallery , 108 Harrison Street, Frenchtown,

908-996-9992.

"A Moment of Pause," a four-artist show featuring new

paintings

and pastels by Albert Alexander, Susan Stuart, Mike Filipiak, and

Paulette Lidert-Groves. Gallery is open Thursday to Sunday, 11 a.m.

to 5 p.m. To July 30.

Coryell Gallery , 8 Coryell Street, Lambertville,

609-397-0804.

The gallery celebrates its 21st annual summer exhibition featuring

the paintings and drawings of National Academy artist Harry Leith-Ross

(1886-1973), an artist raised in England who settled near New Hope

in 1935. Also included in the summer show are gallery artists Joanne

Augustine, Gabrielle Baumgartner, Albert Bross, and Marge Chavooshian.

Gallery is open Wednesday to Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. To August 31.

Greene and Greene Gallery , 32 Bridge Street, Lambertville,

609-397-7774. The eighth annual Discoveries Exhibition featuring 100

limited edition and individual jewelry pieces in gold, sterling, and

fine metals with precious and semi-precious stones and gems. Artists

include Sarah Graham, collaborators Steven Ford and David Forlano,

Elaine Unzicker, Nina Mann, Larry Seiger, and Debbie Tuch. The gallery

also features contemporary furniture by Jeffrey Greene. The gallery

is open Monday to Friday, noon to 5 p.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 11

a.m. to 6 p.m. To September 3.

Urban Series 2001 , In Rare Form Gallery, 14 Church

Street, Lambertville, 609-397-1006. "Urban Series 2001,"

ceramics

by Reinaldo Sanguino are featured. Gallery hours are Thursday through

Sunday, 12 to 5 p.m. and by appointment. To July 31.

Riverbank Arts , 19 Bridge Street, Stockton, 609-397-9330.

Exhibition of recent work by James Feehan continues at the Stockton

gallery through July. The gallery represents over 100 area artists.

Gallery hours are Monday to Wednesday, noon to 5 p.m.; Thursday, 10

a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Sunday 10

a.m. to 6 p.m. To July 31.

Tin Man Alley , 12 West Mechanic Street, New Hope,

215-862-1110.

"Mournful Remembrances" featuring limited edition silk screens

and new prints of posters by Frank Kozik, "the king of the modern

day rock poster." His bands include Nirvana, Rolling Stones, Pearl

Jam, and Smashing Pumpkins. Curated by Jonathan Levine. Gallery hours

are Friday through Tuesday, 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. To July 31.

Top Of Page
Art In Trenton

Artworks , 19 Everett Alley, Trenton, 609-394-9436.

"Splinter

and Spark," a juried exhibition of expertly crafted functional

objects in wood and metal. Exhibiting artists are Jessica Holden,

Robin Lutsey, Ken MacBain, Heather Massinger, Julianna

Molchanova-Menna,

Wendy Most, and Glen Yerkes. Objects include furniture, jewelry, and

"more obscure devices." Gallery hours are Monday through

Thursday

11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sunday 1 to 4 p.m. To July 26.

Extension Gallery , 60 Ward Avenue, Mercerville,

609-890-7777.

"Take Your Life Back," a group exhibition of abstract

sculpture,

drawings, and paintings by James Howell, Doug Signorovitch, Robert

Strang, and Benjamin Keating. Opening reception is Saturday, July

21. Gallery hours are Monday to Thursday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. To August

2.

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Area Museums

New Jersey State Museum , 205 West State Street, Trenton,

609-292-6464. Featured show is "New Jersey, the Garden State,"

an interdisciplinary exhibition of historic tools, prints, and

photographs

created in collaboration with the Department of Agriculture’s Farming

Museum. Museum hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4:45

p.m.; Sunday noon to 5 p.m. Website: www.njstatemuseum.org.

Also: "The Art of Giving," to August 26; "Aspects of

Abstraction,"

to August 26; "The Garden State: A History of Farming in New

Jersey,"

to August 31. On extended view: "New Jersey’s Native Americans:

The Archaeological Record"; "Delaware Indians of New

Jersey";

"The Sisler Collection of North American Mammals"; "Of

Rock and Fire"; "Neptune’s Architects"; "The

Modernists";

"New Jersey Ceramics, Silver, Glass and Iron"; "Washington

Crossing the Delaware."

American Hungarian Foundation , 300 Somerset Street, New

Brunswick, 732-846-5777. "The Art of Baron Laszlo Mednyansky in

Context: Works from the Salgo Trust for Education." An exhibition

of works by the turn-of-the-century aristocratic artist who disguised

himself as a pauper to paint grim images of the underbelly of society.

Museum hours are Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; and Sunday,

1 to 4 p.m. Donation $5. To September 16.

Hunterdon Museum of Art , Lower Center Street, Clinton,

908-735-8415. "National Juried Print Exhibition," selected

by Anne Steele Marsh, printmaker, painter, and museum founder, and

by artist Mohammad Omer Khalil, whose works are in Metropolitan Museum

of Art, Brooklyn Museum, National Museum of African Art, and the

Smithsonian

Institution. Hours are Tuesday to Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. To July

22.

James A. Michener Art Museum , 138 South Pine Street,

Doylestown,

215-340-9800. "George Nakashima and the Modernist Moment,"

a major exhibition that aims to recontextualize the work of George

Nakashima within the practice of European modernism. Long recognized

as a major force in the American craft movement, guest curator Steven

Beyer re-evaluates the designer from a European perspective, using

the works of Finn Juhl, Carlo Mollino, Alexandre Noll, and others,

to demonstrate that Nakashima is an important figure in international

modernism. Museum hours Tuesday to Friday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.;

Saturday

& Sunday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Wednesday evenings to 9 p.m.

Admission

$5 adults; $1.50 students. To September 16.

Rutgers’ Mason Gross School , 15 Livingston Avenue, New

Brunswick, 732-932-7511. "Installed Collections," an art

exhibition

featuring work from seven private collections ranging from American

prints to contemporary leading-edge artists. The show includes works

by MFA graduates in visual art at Mason Gross School of the Arts.

In conjunction with Summerfest 2001, to July 28.

Zimmerli Art Museum , George and Hamilton streets, New

Brunswick, 732-932-7237. Continuing exhibitions include: Selected

artists from Mason Gross School of the Arts Graduate Program

1990-2000,

curated by Lynne Allen, Judith K. Brodsky, and Jeffrey Wechsler, in

conjunction with SummerFest 2001. "New Acquisitions from Central

Asia: Selections from the Norton and Nancy Dodge Collection of Soviet

Nonconformist Art," to July 31. "The Exotic Flower:

Constructions

of Femininity in Late 19th-Century French Art," to July 31.

"The

Uncommon Vision of Sergei Konenkov (1874-1971)," to November 14.

"A World of Story," to July 31. "Japonisme: Highlights

and Themes from the Collection," ongoing.

Regular museum hours are Tuesday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.;

Saturday and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Call for summer hours. Admission

$3 adults; under 18 free; museum is open free to the public on the

first Sunday of every month.

Area Galleries

Hopewell Frame Shop , 24 West Broad Street, Hopewell,

609-466-0817.

"Show Virgins II," featuring watercolors by Gail Bracegirdle

and 17 of her students. Exhibitors include Carol Arnold, Sally

Baldino,

Gwen Bolger, Eileen Borger, Janet Strauss Carlyle, Amy Gimbel, Diane

Koye, and Barbara Krakovitz. Shop hours are Tuesday to Friday, 10

a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. To July 28.

Stony Brook Gallery , Stony Brook-Millstone Watershed

Association, Titus Mill Road, Pennington, 609-737-7592. In the

Buttinger Nature Center, "Small Works of Nature," a juried

theme exhibition. To August 17.


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