It started out as Pi Day — the brainchild of Mimi Omiecinski, owner of Princeton Tour Company, and Joy Chen, owner of Joy Cards at 6 Chambers Street. And then, like the Grinch’s heart, it grew and grew, and behold — Geek Freak Weekend. Celebrate Albert Einstein’s March 14 (pi) birthday all weekend with tours, pie eating contests, Einstein reenactors, airplane and Dinky rides with Einstein, contests, performances, and more. For more information visit www.pidayprinceton.com or call 609-902-3637.

Friday, March 9

3:14 p.m.: Pi Day Pricing begins. Visit www.pidayprinceton.com for details.

6:30 p.m.: Guest speaker Alan Lightman, author of “Einstein’s Dreams.” Princeton Public Library, Community Room. Lightman will speak about the relationships between the sciences and the humanities.

“Einstein’s Dreams” is this year’s Pi Day Book Club pick. A modern classic, “Einstein’s Dreams” is a fictional collage of stories dreamed by Albert Einstein in 1905, when he worked in a patent office in Switzerland. As the defiant but sensitive young genius is creating his theory of relativity, a new conception of time, he imagines many possible worlds. In one, time is circular, so that people are fated to repeat triumphs and failures over and over. In another, there is a place where time stands still, visited by lovers and parents clinging to their children. In another, time is a nightingale, sometimes trapped by a bell jar.

Throughout the weekend the library will be hosting a number of reading groups and will provide multiple copies of the book. Check princetonlibrary.org for specifics.

Saturday, March 10

10 to 11 a.m.: Kids’ violin contest. For ages three to six years, Princeton Public Library, Community Room.

Einstein is known to have loved to play the violin. He even played in the Westminster Community Orchestra — and he was also very fond of children, so it’s fitting that his birthday celebration should include young violinists.

Participants should come prepared to play one piece for beginning violin, such as a selection from the Suzuki repertoire.

This friendly contest will be judged by members of the Princeton Symphony Orchestra staff, and extra credit will be awarded to contestants who come dressed as Einstein.

The first-place winner is awarded $314.15, courtesy of Coordinated Wealth Management.

The first 31 contestants to register will be selected for the competition. Registration details on Pi Day website.

10 a.m. to noon: Princeton University Art Museum. Did you know that the Princeton University Art Museum has artwork by contemporaries of Albert Einstein? The museum is less than two city blocks from Nassau Street. Check out the works of Degas, Monet, Picasso, and much more. Free.

11 a.m. to 4 p.m.: Hourly trolley tours of Einstein’s neighborhood and office park. Sponsored by Princeton Tour Company and Princeton Black Squirrel.

This route will take you to Einstein’s residences and office building. Mimi Omiecinski, owner of Princeton Tour Company, will lead you through the famous streets while telling everything you wanted to know about Time Magazine’s Man of the Century. By the end of this tour, you’ll understand why Einstein called Princeton paradise.

The 30-minute tours are free, first come first seated. Trolley leaves from Princeton Public Library every hour on the hour from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

11 a.m. to noon: Happy Birthday, Albert! at the Historical Society of Princeton. For children ages 6 to 12. $5 child; $4 HSP members. 158 Nassau Street, Princeton.

Who was Albert Einstein? Learn about the public and private life of the famous scientist and humanitarian on a tour of Einstein at Home, featuring his own furniture and personal belongings. Then, play like Einstein – build a house of cards, solve puzzles, and enjoy some cake. Space is limited to 15 children. Call 609-921-6748, x102 to reserve a space.

11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.: Mathlete Challenge, Princeton Public Library, Community Room. The Mathlete Challenge is made up of a series of speed and timed rounds followed by a final championship round. The entire challenge including time for registration and awards will be approximately two hours. The actual challenge portion will be about 90 minutes.

Speed Round: Mathletes compete head-to-head, racing against each other and the clock to be the first to answer correctly within the allotted time.

Timed Round: Mathletes are given a series of problems and race against the clock to get the most right within the allotted time.

Championship Round: The top Mathletes from the speed and timed rounds face off against each other to determine the winner.

Middle school aged youth: grades 6 through 8.

Winning contestant is awarded $314.15, courtesy of Pi Day Princeton.

The first 31 contestants to register will be selected for the competition.

1 to 1:30 pm: PiKu, Princeton Public Library, third floor children’s section.

Children and adults are invited to drop in and create their own PiKu to add to the display board on the library’s third floor. While the Japanese verse Haiku is written in 17 syllables divided into three lines of 5, 7 and 5, PiKu is eight syllables divided into three lines of 3, 1 and 4 syllables.

2 to 2:30 p.m.: Rubik’s Cube Challenge, Princeton Public Library, Community Room.

Watch world record holders from the Cube Club of Princeton University alongside some of the area’s fastest Rubik’s Cube aficionados as they demonstrate their skills. Stay afterwards and learn trade secrets from the masters.

3 to 4 p.m.: Meeting of the Minds, Princeton Public Library, Community Room.

Meet these authors and Einstein experts, and have your books signed:

Alice Calaprice & Freeman Dyson, “The Ultimate Quotable Einstein” with foreword by Freeman Dyson

Robert Schulmann, “Einstein on Politics”

Linda Arntzenius, “Images of America: Institute for Advanced Study”

Josef Eisinger, “Einstein on the Road.”

Labyrinth Books is the official bookseller for Author Alley, 122 Nassau Street.

3:30 to 5 p.m.: I HEART Pi Family Photo Op, Princeton Public Library, fireplace area. Move over Hollywood — this is Princeton’s genius version of a red carpet. Families and friends pose for our official photographer, Monica Pedalino of Ferrari Iris View.

4 to 5 p.m.: Happy Birthday, Albert! at the Historical Society of Princeton. For children ages 6 to 12. $5 child; $4 HSP members. 158 Nassau Street, Princeton

Who was Albert Einstein? Learn about the public and private life of the famous scientist and humanitarian on a tour of Einstein at Home, featuring his own furniture and personal belongings. Then, play like Einstein — build a house of cards, solve puzzles, and enjoy some cake.

Space is limited to 15 children. Call 609-921-6748, x102 to reserve a space.

4 to 6 p.m.: Geek Freak No-Socks Sock Hop, YWCA of Princeton, 59 Paul Robeson Place. Sponsored by PiFight Band & YWCA of Princeton.

Dance contests and prizes. Family fun for all ages. $3.14 per person, includes one free root beer float with admission.

Einstein didn’t particularly love to wear socks, thus the No-Socks Sock Hop! The PiFight Band, the official band of Einstein’s Alley, plays covers from the ’60s through today and is guaranteed to knock your socks off.

7:30 p.m.: The Princeton Theatre Experiment and the Arts Council of Princeton present a staged reading of Peter Cook and William Lanouette’s historical play, “Uranium + Peaches,” Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, Solley Theater.

“Uranium + Peaches” is the story of the meeting in Spartanburg, South Carolina, of Manhattan Project scientists Leo Szilard and Harold Urey with influential politician James Byrnes, soon to become Secretary of State under President Truman. Szilard is the physicist who urged Einstein to write the letter to FDR, which led to the beginning of America’s efforts to build the atomic bomb.

Szilard and Urey are now visiting Byrnes urging him to persuade Washington not to use the atomic bomb on Japan. It is late May, 1945. Hitler committed suicide one month ago. The Allies have ended World War II in Europe. Does ending the war in Asia require such a weapon? Weigh the arguments of two sides that believe deeply in diametrically opposed positions.

The playwright William Lanouette will be at the reading, and there will be a discussion afterward. Lanouette has had a long career as a writer and journalist. He has written for the Atlantic, the Economist, the Washington Post, and Newsweek. He is the former Washington correspondent for the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, and he has written “Genius in the Shadows: A Biography of Leo Szilard, The Man Behind the Bomb.”

Cast from professional New Jersey actors, the reading will be staged and directed by Todd Reichart, artistic director of the Princeton Theatre Experiment. $3.14 (but $5 will be happily accepted).

Sunday, March 11

10 a.m. to noon: Princeton University Art Museum. Did you know that the Princeton University Art Museum has artwork by contemporaries of Albert Einstein? The museum is less than two city blocks from Nassau Street. Check out the works of Degas, Monet, Picasso, and much more. Free.

11 a.m.: Pie Eating Contest – McCaffrey’s, Princeton Shopping Center, at the sit down dining area.

Contestant age groups: youth (4 to 8 years and 9 to 13 years), teen (14 to 18 years), and adult (19 years and up). Participants must sign waivers. Minors must be accompanied by an adult. Adults will consume a regular size pie. Youths will consume a miniature size pie.

Those interested in competing are encouraged to register in advance. Those who attend without registering may have an opportunity to participate, but due to possible space and timing limitations, we cannot guarantee participation to anyone who is not registered by Wednesday, March 7.

11 a.m. to noon: Happy Birthday, Albert! at the Historical Society of Princeton. For children ages 6 to 12. $5 child; $4 HSP members. 158 Nassau Street, Princeton.

Who was Albert Einstein? Learn about the public and private life of the famous scientist and humanitarian on a tour of Einstein at Home, featuring his own furniture and personal belongings. Then, play like Einstein – build a house of cards, solve puzzles, and enjoy some cake. Space is limited to 15 children. Call 609-921-6748, x102 to reserve a space.

Noon to 1:11 p.m.: Dinky Train rides with Einstein.

Be like Einstein and ride the Dinky train into Princeton. Meet Einstein, his mother, first girlfriend, first wife, secretary, and good friends. Be sure to ask “Einstein” where he is going on the train because sometimes he forgets.

Departing Princeton Station: noon, 12:27 p.m., and 1 p.m.

Departing Princeton Junction Station: 12:11p.m., 12:37 p.m., and 1:11 p.m.

$2.75 per adult each way, up to two kids (ages 5 to 11) can ride free with a passenger paying any valid fare.

1 p.m. to ?: Pi Recitation Contest, Princeton Public Library, Community Room. Marc Umile, 2007 Pi Recitation North American Champion with over 15,000 digits in Pi, will join us to assist in the official counting of digits.

Contestant age groups: youth (7 to 13 years), teen (14 to 18 years), adult (19 years and up).

Minors must be accompanied by an adult.

Youngest winning contestant is awarded $314.15, courtesy of MacLean Agency.

2:30 p.m.: Pie judging contest at infini-T Cafe, 4 Hulfish Street, masterminded by Princeton resident, Tamera Matteo. Move over "Top Chef." This year Princeton residents will determine the winner of the coveted “Best Tasting Pie in Princeton” award.

Beginning at 2:30 p.m., the first 50 guests to arrive will be the judges. They will receive small samples of professionally baked pie submissions and choose the winning pie.

3 p.m.: Writer’s Block at the Arts Council of Princeton

Presenting scientific and not-so-scientific comic shorts and songs.

3:14 to 4:14 p.m.: Pie throwing, Palmer Square Green.

Bring your favorite friend or frenemy to this hysterical event.

$1 per throw. All proceeds benefit 101, a non-profit volunteer organization dedicated to helping Princeton High School graduates in need of financial assistance for college.

3:30 to 5 p.m.: Einstein Re-Enactor Tours by Princeton Tour Company

Learn the chronological history of Albert Einstein as told by his family and friends. Re-Enactors are “hidden” within local shops. Tours start at Princeton Public Library where you pick up a map to find the first re-enactor — Einstein’s mother! Get ready, she’s a pistol. Here’s who you’ll meet:

Pauline, Einstein’s mother, played by Donna Renner, mother of co-founder of Pi Day Princeton.

Marie, Einstein’s first girlfriend, played by Allison Herring, Montgomery High School student.

Albert Einstein, played by Bill Agress, a professional re-enactor for AT&T.

Mileva, Einstein’s wife, played by Jennifer Pirecki, therapist and super fan of Pi Day Princeton.

Robert Oppenheimer, played by Henry Vega, administration, Princeton University Art Museum.

Kurt Godel, played by Dan Bauer, public relations, McCarter Theater.

4 to 5 p.m.: Happy Birthday, Albert! at the Historical Society of Princeton. For children ages 6 to 12. $5 child; $4 HSP members. 158 Nassau Street, Princeton.

Who was Albert Einstein? Learn about the public and private life of the famous scientist and humanitarian on a tour of Einstein at Home, featuring his own furniture and personal belongings. Then, play like Einstein — build a house of cards, solve puzzles, and enjoy some cake.

Space is limited to 15 children. Call 609-921-6748, x102 to reserve a space.

5 p.m.: Einstein Look-A-Like Contest, Princeton Public Library, Community Room. Fun for all ages. Contestants may portray any age of Einstein.

Is Pi Day your birthday? You can be one of our lifetime judges.

Winning contestant in youngest category is awarded $314.15, courtesy of Princeton Regional Convention & Visitors Bureau.

Wednesday, March 14

Happy Birthday Einstein! Happy Pi Day!

3:14 a.m. and p.m.: Visit www.PiDayPrinceton.com to find out winners of challenges, see photos and videos of the events, and congratulatory shout-outs to winners.

10 to 10:45 a.m.: Curator’s tour of Einstein exhibit at the Historical Society of Princeton.

A special exhibition featuring selected pieces of furniture from the Einstein Collection of the Historical Society of Princeton. Through these rarely seen objects, visitors will have the chance to glimpse the personal side of this world-famous scientist. Free. Space is limited to 20 people. Call 609-921-6748, extension 102, to reserve a space.

11a.m. and 2 p.m.: Walking tour of Einstein’s neighborhood.

You’ll see Albert Einstein’s homes (he lived in two places, not just 112 Mercer) while you hear all about his home life, his friendships with other geniuses (Robert Oppenheimer, Kurt Godel, and John von Neumann — they lived in Princeton too) and Einstein’s remarkable humanitarian efforts.

$3.14 per person. All proceeds benefit the Princeton Public Library.

7 p.m.: Screening of “Ball of Fire” (1941). Fun movie about a team of stuffy academics living in New Jersey, starring Barbara Stanwyck and Gary Cooper. Princeton Public Library, Community Room.

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