When Questions Are the Answers: Kepner-Tregoe

Bill Paying.com

Disability Help

Corporate Angels

Corrections or additions?

These articles by Melinda Sherwood were published in U.S. 1 Newspaper on

October 13, 1999. All rights reserved.

E-Commerce Caution: Marjorie Chertok

The great Web goldrush has produced a lot of half-baked

business plans and bad contracts, says Marge Chertok of Pitney,

Hardin, Kipp & Suzich LLP in Morristown. "Several E-businesses

have suffered major embarrassments in the press because they have

`gone live’ on the web before the ink was dry on joint venture, or

other central agreements," she says. "Many businesses fail to

realize that standard contract terms and conventional parameters of

reasonable amounts of time for delays do not apply to the

instantaneous

time-table of web commerce."

"Think before You Link," is Chertok’s presentation to the

New Jersey Technology Council on Thursday, October 14, at 8 a.m. at

Mercer College. Stephen J. Casey, CEO of

WaresOnTheWeb.com,

will present "Battle Zone of E-Commerce: Retailers vs.

Manufacturers,"

and Jim Medalia, president of Justballs.com, will discuss

his E-commerce venture. Call 609-419-4444.

A Brooklyn native, Chertok received a degree in economics and

statistics

from Brooklyn College, Class of 1981, and a law degree from St. John’s

in New York. A former computer programmer, Chertok is now an expert

in Internet-related law, which is only now beginning to mature.

"There’s

a lot of pending legislation concerning digital signatures and privacy

issues," she says. "The Digital Millennium Copyright Act

(October

12, 1998) has significant implications for ISPs dealing with caching,

where you copy someone else’s site for the purposes of downloading

it."

Prior to the act, ISPs were liable for reproducing copyrighted

information,

even if it was merely transferring from one site to another, via

E-Mail

for example. "AOL or Yahoo picks up an article that you’re sending

to me," explains Chertok, "and I forward it over to your

website

and you post it up on the website. Technically, a copy of that article

has been made in these different machines, and then people access

it. They would be technically violating copyright law." Just as

a copy shop would be liable for reproducing copyrighted papers on

its premises, so too ISPs were responsible for materials that passed

through its lines.

Due to the volume of transmission over ISPs, however, Congress now

grants ISPs the same leniency that it does telephone providers: if

they can’t control the content, they aren’t liable for copyright

infringements.

However, to exercise this right, an ISP has to adopt a written policy

of termination of subscribers and account holders who are repeat

copyright

offenders, designate someone (usually the webmaster) to receive

complaints

about copyright infringements, and register that person with the

copyright

office.

On the flip side, businesses also need to think about protecting

themselves

in contracts with ISPs for Internet access or web-hosting, says

Chertok.

Before you sign with an ISP, Chertok suggests you look for the

following

in the contract:

Designated response time in case of system errors and

site design corrections.

Formal disaster recovery plan and back up facilities.

State-of-the-art security protocols, particularly if

customers

will be conducting commercial transactions over the site. The contract

should clarify that upgrades will be on an ongoing basis.

Procedures for continually monitoring the vendor mix so

that if it is unacceptable, the contract can be terminated without

penalty.

Top Of Page
When Questions Are the Answers: Kepner-Tregoe

Imagine what you might do with a map of Einstein’s

brain:

Study the thinking patterns, imitate them, maybe steal some ideas?

Kepner-Tregoe Inc. on Research Road would sell it.

Although Ben Tregoe, co-founder of the consulting firm, didn’t

get to pick Einstein’s brain, he did spend several years studying the

thinking process of Air Force pilots while working at the RAND

Corporation during the 1950s. Kepner-Tregoe has since patented the

thinking processes of those pilots and is selling it to companies that

want to enhance their brain-power.

For troubleshooting in the manufacturing industries, says Michael

Clark, a senior consultant at Kepner-Tregoe, those skills are

enormously

valuable. "On the one side they want to maximize their business

performance by increasing productivity," he says, "but on

the other side there is this overarching need to comply with FDA

regulations,

and organizations are having a difficult time balancing those two

things."

On Friday, October 15, at 8:30 a.m. at the Princeton Marriott,

Kepner-Tregoe

teaches managers in the pharmaceutical and medical device industries

how to apply the firm’s problem-solving techniques to FDA’s Current

Good Manufacturing Processes. Cost: $275. Call 609-252-2274.

Kepner-Tregoe’s patented process adds to the tool chest of

knowledge

management, but it differs from some of the other KM tools, says

Clark,

who worked in manufacturing for several years and holds a BS in

industrial

engineering from Buffalo State University, Class of 1987. "Most

of the other systems are information technology-based," he says.

"Ours is based on people’s behaviors, because your knowledge will

only be as good as the questions managers are asking."

Eureka! The question is the answer. "You start by asking very

specific questions," says Clark about the approach, "then

you begin to speculate on possible causes, evaluate those possible

causes, test the causes, then confirm the true causes."

The results: "For a medical device manufacturer we significantly

increased their customer service perception because their service

people were able to significantly solve programs," says Clark.

"Just because people got a little bit smarter."

Top Of Page
Bill Paying.com

Bell Atlantic Mobile now offers bill pay services to

its wireless phone customers. They can view their accounts online

at http://www.bam.com and view their monthly bill statements and

usage patterns. The service includes E-mail notification when a bill

arrives, and payments can be submitted electronically. The

Bedminster-based

company which has 6.6 million customers uses a Secure Socket Layer

(SSL). The company reports that by the year 2002, 15 million

households

will pay bills online, as opposed to only 3 million households this

year.

Top Of Page
Disability Help

Perhaps you have wanted to hire people with disabilities

but couldn’t afford the training costs or office modifications. The

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services (609-292-7948) can

help you smoothly integrate people with disabilities into your

businesses.

Among its services: interpreting the American with Disabilities Act,

providing counseling and placement services for people with

disabilities.

The division will pay up to half a trainee’s salary and help identify

tax incentives for the company.

Top Of Page
Corporate Angels

Volunteers from Fleet Bank, Merrill Lynch, and

Commodities

Corporation/Goldman Sachs will participate in the third annual

Check-out Hunger Supermarket Sprint on Wednesday, October 13, at 7:30

p.m. at McCaffrey’s market in Southfield Shopping Center. In addition

to the actual race, shoppers can participate; they can tear off a

donation slip for $1, $3, or $5 and it is added to their bill as a

donation to the Mercer Street Friends Food Cooperative.

Other markets participating in the Check-Out Hunger program are

Acme,

Marrazzo’s Thriftway, Pathmark, Pennington Market, ShopRite,

SuperFresh,

and Wegmans. Donations go to the food cooperative that, this year,

will distribute one million pounds of food.


Previous Story Next Story


Corrections or additions?


This page is published by PrincetonInfo.com

— the web site for U.S. 1 Newspaper in Princeton, New Jersey.

Facebook Comments