Commerce Enablement Services

Dow Jones Training

Freelance Associates: Effective Web Sites By

Global Internet

The Lepus Group

Corrections or additions?

These advertorials were published in U.S. 1 Newspaper on June 30,

1999.

Companies to Watch

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Commerce Enablement Services

Electronic commerce (eCommerce). We’ve all heard what

it can do for a business. Look what it did for Amazon.com. Ever wonder

what it could do for your business?

"The eCommerce field is changing rapidly," notes Tom

Fitzgerald,

president of Commerce Enablement Services (CES) in Kendall Park.

"Clients

need to find out what the current best practices are and how to

customize

them to fit their business needs. That requires an understanding of

the competitive landscape, alternative technologies, and distinctive

implementation." In other words, it requires a strategic partner

experienced in putting it all together and making it happen. CES has

been that partner for a broad number of companies in financial

services,

retailing, manufacturing, and transportation. Also, CES has worked

with new ventures as their technology partner, helping them execute

their Internet-focused business strategy.

Just over one year old, Commerce Enablement Services has worked with

clients such as Chase Manhattan Bank, Peterson’s Publishing, and

Symbol

Technologies. CES offers electronic commerce consulting and

development

services and up-to-the-minute expertise in all things eCommerce,

including

payment systems, catalogs, retailing, bill presentment, Internet

security,

and credit card acceptance.

For the smaller company, the concept of eCommerce can seem daunting.

eCommerce has been widely touted to require deep pockets to be done

effectively. But there are alternatives. CES has created a new

service,

the Company Store, aimed at providing an eCommerce solution that

addresses

a specific need common to all sizes of companies.

The Company Store functions as an online catalog for a company’s

promotional

apparel such as golf shirts and caps. Wishing to present a gift to

a client, team member, etc., a company simply mails a gift card with

a description of the gift, the Company Store web address, and a unique

promotion code. The recipient can choose which apparel they like,

what size they need, and gives their most up-to-date contact

information.

The recipient gets a high quality gift that they actually want, and

the company knows that their gift went to someone who they targeted.

The company retains that contact information for continued

relationship

development and tracking — a vital aspect to the Company Store

that is missing in traditional methods of distribution. Also, the

Company Store is enabled to accept credit card transactions, so

consumers

and employees who want to show their affiliation for that company

finally have a way to purchase these items. And what company does

not want to build a stronger customer relationship?

Says Michael Rondelli, Marketing Manager for CES: "The focus at

CES is to help clients realize the benefits of eCommerce. That means

thinking strategically and finding creative applications. For example,

our Company Store takes an age-old practice of gift giving and makes

it a valuable, trackable tool. That is what makes eCommerce so

exciting;

it is a tool that expands our business choices."

For each client, the application of eCommerce may be different, but

it is an opportunity no business serious about success should shy

away from.

Commerce Enablement Services, 732-398-3994. Fax:

732-398-3997.

E-mail: info@enablement.com. Web Site:

http://www.enablement.com.

Top Of Page
Dow Jones Training

Companies and individuals require thorough education

and skill-building training programs if they want to make the most

of their investment in hardware, software, and a networking system.

Dow Jones Training Systems offers systems, network, and applications

training through a wide range of courses covering Microsoft

technologies,

UNIX/Solaris, LAN/WAN multi-vendor internetworking, the Internet,

and Adobe.

Conveniently located in Central New Jersey on Route 1 north of

Princeton,

Dow Jones’ spacious training facility consists of nine classrooms

equipped with the latest model computers and projection devices. All

computers are networked and have Internet access through a dedicated

TI Circuit.

Says Michael Wishnick, manager of Dow Jones Training Services:

"Our

caring and enthusiastic instructors and support personnel make

learning

at Dow Jones Training Services an enjoyable and rewarding experience.

We look forward to introducing new customers to our pleasant lakeside

facility."

Classes are hands-on, one student per work station, and taught by

instructors with extensive practical experience in a relaxed and

friendly

atmosphere. The maximum class size is 12.

Dow Jones’ cost-effective and comprehensive programs provide a

real-world

environment in which system end-users, software developers, and system

and network administrators learn the necessary skills to work smarter,

not harder.

Dow Jones Training Services is a Microsoft Certified Technical

Education

Center as well as an Authorized Adobe Learning Provider.

As a Microsoft CTEC, Dow Jones Training Services offers the complete

Microsoft curriculum, preparing students for various certifications

such as Microsoft Office User Specialist, Microsoft Certified Systems

Engineer, Microsoft Certified Product Specialist, MCSE and Internet

Specialist, Microsoft Certified Database Administrator and Microsoft

Certified Solution Developer. The curriculum involves courses such

as Windows NT 4.0/5.0, TCP/IP, SMS 2.0, SQL, Server 7.0, Exchange

5.5, and Visual Basic 6.0.

UNIX/Solaris courses include a five-day UNIX/Solaris Essentials class,

followed by System Administration, Network Administration, and Script

Writing for Solaris Administrators.

Adobe certification has enabled Dow Jones Training Services to round

out its desktop publishing curriculum by offering PageMaker, Acrobat,

Photoshop and Illustrator.

Dow Jones Training Services has just recently introduced its evening

curriculum, enabling students to pursue certification at night. Also,

loan finance programs are available through the Sallie Mae Financial

Corporation and the Microsoft Skills 2000 IT Career Loan Program.

Both programs offer low monthly payments and fast applications

approval.

Dow Jones Training Services phone: 609-520-5111. E-mail:

djtrain@dowjones.com. Course descriptions and schedules are

available

on the Web at http://www.dj.com/training.

Top Of Page
Freelance Associates: Effective Web Sites By

Design

Effective web sites by design. That’s what the

Lawrenceville-based

creative design firm, Freelance Associates, has been providing to

clients since 1996.

The company, already well known among the area’s top corporations

for creating exciting marketing materials including ads, collateral

pieces, and logo designs, is quickly developing a reputation as a

premier web site designer as well.

"The key benefit that Freelance Associates is able to offer

web site clients is creative design expertise," says Freelance

Associates President Joseph Dougherty. "Because of our 20-year

background in design and advertising, we are able to incorporate

marketing

and aesthetic principles into each design, in order to ensure that

the sites we create are compelling."

Dougherty adds that although the Internet is a relatively new medium,

traditional marketing principles still apply when it comes to

utilizing

a web site as a communications tool. "Our staff carefully

constructs

the copy, layout, color scheme and flow of each site, in much the

same way that we create an ad or brochure,"says Dougherty.

"Tech

web creation companies are able to provide technical expertise, but

most are not able to offer marketing advice as well."

In addition to web site creation, Freelance Associates still provides

traditional marketing and advertising. "This is a considerable

advantage for our clients," says Dougherty. "Because of the

broad base of services that we offer, we are able to ensure that the

company’s corporate brochure, ads, and other marketing materials

correspond

with the look and overall communications message presented on the

web site.

According to Dougherty, Freelance Associates’ web site clients

run the gamut from small, start-up firms to Fortune 150 corporations.

Freelance Associates is able to create a web site to suit any budget

and to meet any specifications, from simple to highly complex. Large

or small, however, each site is designed to attract customer interest

and to achieve results.

When asked what he sees as the future of the web site design industry,

Dougherty replies "Change. Internet marketing is still in its

infancy — as is Internet technology, but both are rapidly becoming

more sophisticated."

Dougherty adds that Internet users are also becoming more

sophisticated.

"A few years ago, Internet use was not as prevalent or as integral

to business as it is today. Now nearly everyone — from business

executives to kids — are on the web and know how to use it

well."

As for Freelance Associates, Dougherty believes that much at his

company

will remain constant. "Technology will always change," says

Dougherty.

"But the principles that create outstanding

marketing/communications

and customer service will stay the same, and they are the things that

our clients will always be able to rely on Freelance Associates to

provide, regardless of changes in technology."

Freelance Associates, 2909 Route 1, Lawrenceville,

609-771-4441.

Fax: 609-771-4442. E-mail: info@freelance-assoc.com. Web site:

http://www.freelance-assoc.com.

Top Of Page
Global Internet

Images, GI3.com

As a partner at Global Internet Images Inc., GI3.com,

Kevin Frankenfield knows that with the proliferation of Internet

technology

businesses, what makes the difference, and defines success, is knowing

what works best for the client.

"First, and foremost, you have to know how to best use the

technology,"

says Frankenfield. His tips for successful sites:

1. Avoid using frames. "This is more than an issue

of personal preference. It comes down to what makes the site easy

to navigate." Frankenfield recalls a client who felt as if the

frames in his old site gave visitors a virtual whiplash. "In

addition

to being hard to navigate, it can prove an impossible challenge if

a visitor wants to save information." His opinion is supported

by the HTML Writer’s Guild recommendation against the use of frames

for Web sites.

2. The site should download quickly. "Anyone who has

ever visited a site where huge graphics delayed viewing the site knows

the frustration that causes. A trick of the trade is to have text

appear first, allowing the visitor to take in the information as the

graphics load. If you have to wait, it wasn’t designed right."

3. A common request of clients is for the site to lead the

list on search engines. "This is a marketing consideration,

requiring a plan that frequently submits the site to search engines

and revisits keyword choices. Too often, it’s a forgotten element

of site maintenance."

4. The site should be designed with the visitor in mind.

"Simply put, this means the site should be professional in

appearance,

with distinctive design and appropriate content that meets and exceeds

an audience’s expectations and needs."

5. The site should provide a reason to return. "The

site should provide something useful to the reader. To determine this,

it’s important to monitor use and review visitor logs to know what

is working and what isn’t."

With so many Internet companies vying for your business, the

best way to make the decision is to view the sites they have developed

for clients. From http://www.gi3.com, you can visit sites such

as one

developed for an Italian coffee company when they embarked on breaking

into the American market (http://www.caffe-corsini.com). Another

example

is a site designed for West Shore Tennis, a tennis club on Staten

Island.

But beyond knowing what works best with the technology, you need to

know what works best with the client. "An off-the-shelf approach

just won’t work. You need to listen carefully and know how to help

clients define their needs," says Frankenfield. "It comes

down to a personal touch our larger competitors simply can’t compete

with."

Though a small company, GI3 is destined to grow with its clients.

With business packages, such as Web sites from $299, and knowing how

to pursue E-commerce on a budget, the focus is on providing a

competitive

edge for a client’s success. "Their success is our success."

GI3 serves the Tri-State area with Web design and maintenance and

Web/hardware/software support, software training and educational

services.

GI3.com, 126 Lakedale Drive, Lawrenceville, 609-695-1125.

E-mail:info@gi3.com. Web Site: http://www.gi3.com.

Top Of Page
The Lepus Group

While most companies delivering computer and

Internet-based

technology services are focused on Y2K, one technology company is

thinking ahead. "What about after Y2K?" asks Bob Raffo Jr.,

president of The Lepus Group in Princeton.

Raffo has a good idea where technology will take us next. That’s why

the nearly 10-year-old firm has been reinventing itself for the last

year and a half, changing its focus from traditional client- server

applications to Internet-based deliverables. The change in the company

was prompted by the development of the industry, the technology, and

market demands. "In the last decade, we’ve seen what technology

has done for and to businesses. What business hasn’t had to upgrade

equipment merely to keep up with application demands? Imagine a

business

that has 486 processors and is running Windows 95. As applications

require more horsepower, the business has had no choice but to upgrade

processing power and disk space for each desktop and at great expense.

But now they have a choice."

By applying Web-based technology to client server applications, client

server applications can be delivered through a browser. "This

means that businesses are no longer restricted to a singular

environment,

such as Windows. Their applications can be available remotely and

used on palmtops, laptops, and desktops, regardless of whether they’re

Macs, Unix, or Windows environments. You can run the application

anywhere

you run a browser," says Raffo. "The result is a better use

of the technology and stream-lined productivity and cost efficiency.

Clients don’t need to constantly increase desktop power in order to

deploy new applications. They will need more on the server end of

the technology, but the savings and benefits far outweigh those

costs."

And it’s not a technology that only serves large corporations. The

Lepus Group has increased its focus to include small business,

creating

an affordable package for businesses as small as two or three people.

One client, The Resource Partnership, a human resources consulting

firm, has The Lepus Group hosting their virtual private network for

Web-based time sheet reporting management, calendaring, and

traditional

file server functions. The Lepus Group’s network center hosts the

client’s server through which all 25 employees across the country

are connected as if they’re all in one office. The cost of their wide

area network nationwide is only that of local Internet connection

and they now have centralized information distribution and greater

control of their business process.

No matter how big or small your company is, if you have more than

one dial-up connection, if you have more than one person working on

a project at one time, or if you’re selling to customers and have

to get information to them more efficiently without having your people

tied up on the phone, you can benefit from Internet-based

technologies.

The opportunities are endless.

With Internet-based technology, The Lepus Group is delivering the

ultimate virtual business. Says Raffo, "Every business needs to

be using the Internet for business. The marketing push we’ve seen

with the Internet over the last few years is just the tip of the

iceberg

when it comes to how the technology can serve businesses. Consider

how national businesses like Amazon.com or Barnes&Noble.com have

impacted

smaller, local bookstores. Businesses need to use the Internet to

defend their market. Businesses need to realize that the Internet

is not a luxury, it’s now a necessary component of a successful

business

strategy."

The Lepus Group, 209 Wall Street, Princeton, 609-279-0363.

Fax: 609-279-0263. Web Site: http://www.lepusgroup.com.


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