To the Editor

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Prepared for the September 20, 2000 edition of U.S. 1 Newspaper.

All rights reserved.

Between the Lines: Race for the Cure

Last year at this time, we at U.S. 1 were gathering

ourselves together to support the Princeton YWCA’s Breast Cancer

Resource

Center at the Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. We were mourning the

loss of our co-worker and dear friend, Karen Sly Miller, who had just

died at age 43 of breast cancer. We mustered a team of walkers and

racers for the race and found it was an uplifting way to celebrate

Karen’s life and support the fight against the disease.

Again this year the U.S. 1 team will be at the race on Sunday, October

29, again at Bristol-Myers Squibb. Sadly we will be racing for not

one, but two women — Joan Terry, 50, the wife of U.S. 1

photographer

Craig Terry, died of breast cancer on September 6. In addition to

helping Craig in his business, Joan was co-founder of a non-profit

equestrian riding program that helps children with special needs.

She also home-schooled the four Terry children — their oldest,

Brad, is an attorney at Reed Smith Shaw & McClay in Princeton

Forrestal

Village.

You are invited to join us — and 8,000 other people — at this

exciting and inspiring event. Get a race application by calling the

Breast Cancer Resource Center at 609-252-2003. Or attend the launch

party for the race on Thursday, September 21, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

at Bristol-Myers Squibb’s Route 206 campus. The party features

business

and community leaders, corporate sponsors, breast cancer survivors,

and volunteers, plus music and culinary delights. It costs $19 and

requires registration; call 609-252-2008. See you there. And if you

are a woman, please check. When was your last mammogram?

Top Of Page
To the Editor

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Geology Department employee Patricia

Gaspari-Bridges’

recent letter concerning the planned elimination of Princeton’s

natural

history museum asserts that "It is inconceivable that we would

disband such a valuable geosciences [book] collection."

Funny thing — it wasn’t inconceivable for Princeton to disband

the most complete collection of Northwest Coast Native American

artifacts

this side of the Rockies (formerly on display in Guyot Hall), nor

to ship the majority of the extensive archaeological and

paleontological

collections out of state. Both events occurred during the Geology

library’s last major expansion into Guyot Hall.

Evidently, Princeton’s definition of a "valuable collection"

didn’t include these scientific and cultural treasures, which had

been painstakingly assembled by Princeton researchers (including my

father, Dr. Donald Baird) over more than 150 years. They may have

been valueless in Princeton’s eyes . . . but institutions such as

Dartmouth and Yale were all too happy to snap up these collections

when Princeton decided they were excess baggage.

And now the Geology Department, having already taken over about

two-thirds

of the main floor display area in Guyot Hall, wants all the rest for

its ever-expanding library — and so the remainder of what was

once a small but excellent natural history museum is to be disbanded

and shipped out of state. "Inconceivable," Ms.

Gaspari-Bridges?

I only wish it were!

Andy Baird


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