Contributing Poets

Contributing Prose Authors

To the Editor: On `Pretty’ Voices

Company Index

Corrections or additions?

This column was prepared for the July 25, 2001

edition of U.S. 1 Newspaper. All rights reserved.

Between the Lines

Welcome to U.S. 1’s midsummer dream, the publication

of our fifth annual summer fiction issue — a chance for us to

take a one-week break from the grind of newspaper production and a

chance for you to experience some different voices and different kinds

of stories in our humble journal.

About that break: This is a "double issue" of U.S. 1. We will

skip an issue on August 1 and return to our normal schedule on

Wednesday,

August 8. Our office will be open throughout that period so please

continue to direct your inquiries to phone 609-452-7000, fax

609-452-0033,

or E-mail info@princetoninfo.com.

About those different voices and stories: This year’s Summer Fiction

issue, beginning on page 15, includes one short play, short stories

by 21 writers, and poems by 13 poets. They were selected by Preview

editor Nicole Plett and arts writer Pat Summers, both of whom have

worked together on previous editions of Summer Fiction.

From the nearly 100 submissions, how did Plett and Summers winnow

the field down to 35 final submissions? Some choices were based on

what struck their fancy — and what didn’t. Some work seemed

particularly

suited to the U.S. 1 audience and other pieces seemed far afield.

Other choices were based on fairness — every year someone who

has patiently submitted works in prior years but has never been

published

gets the nod over someone whose work has been previously published.

After Plett and Summers do their work, Richard K. Rein makes the final

space allocation and then does the final editing and chiseling to

make them all fit. This year one short story — all dressed up

by Plett and Summers for publication — had to be left in the lurch

as the paper went to press.

And for the first time (but probably not the last), a piece of poetry

was victimized by information age technology. The piece required

"special

formatting," Plett told Rein. But when the editor checked the

original copy to see what that formatting was he discovered only an

E-mail file, which printed out in various ways depending on the

printer

receiving it. With the deadline looming, Rein noted that the

contributor

was a 13-year-old — surely he will have a chance to resubmit his

poem for 2002.

All writers — published or not — and all those who appreciate

the writing that goes into U.S. 1 are invited to join us on Tuesday,

August 14, from 5 to 7 p.m. at Micawber Books on Nassau Street in

Princeton. We will introduce the writers, read some poems and short

stories, and show doubters that literature is still alive and well.

Please help us prove that point.

Note to Internet readers: Due to copyright considerations, none

of the literary submissions are available on the Internet at this

website.

Top Of Page
Contributing Poets

The following had poems included in this issue.

Penelope Scambly Schott, Paula Neves, Marvin Harold Cheiten, Brad X.

Terry, Tony Gruenewald, Charles H. Johnson, Donna J. Gelagotis Lee,

Cheryl Evans Pedersen, Hanna Fox, Robin Carr, Bill Waters, Patrick

Walsh, Myra Weiner.

Top Of Page
Contributing Prose Authors

The following had prose selections included in this issue.

E.E. Whiting, Lucia S. DiPolvere, Anne Waldron Neumann, Janet Kirk,

Meera Kumar, Rebecca Burr, Thomas Contiliano, Joel Kirschbaum, Robert

Motley, Elaine Togneri, Jack L. Cohen, John Symons, Margaret O’Gorman,

Andrea Mandel, Bill Hart, Carol A. Blunno, Barbara W. Eklund, Mae

Kaemmerlen, Adele Polomski, Morton Zachter, Kim Riemann, R.M. Scott.

Top Of Page
To the Editor: On `Pretty’ Voices

As a professional musician, I was dismayed to read

Elaine

Strauss’ comments on the vocal performances in her review of Opera

Festival of New Jersey’s production of "Orfeo ed Euridice"

(U.S. 1, July 18). The singing of Christine Brandes was the highlight

of the performance. She sang with technical prowess, incredible

artistry,

and great conviction. What Ms. Strauss terms "harsh" is known

as "ring" or "squillo" in the business. It is what

makes the voice carry over an orchestra in a large house, and its

presence allows Ms. Brandes to have a successful career performing

leading roles with some of the finest companies in the world.

Many listeners today are not attuned to the sound of a truly stellar

voice, because that which makes the voice vibrant and individual is

removed in the recording process, leaving an even, homogeneous,

sometimes

boring sound. We are fortunate to have had the chance this summer

to hear a number of excellent singers with more than just

"pretty"

voices in Princeton.

Bonnie Draina

Top Of Page
Company Index

Aegis Property Group, 55; Borden-Perlman Insurance, 58; Buchanan

Ingersoll, 13; Career Resource Group, 60; Center for Healthcare

Strategies,

56; Chauncey Group, 59; Colliers Houston, 13; Commonwealth Business

Media, 14; Computer America Training, 58; DPRA, 57.

E-Vue, 56; Ellipsis Communication, 9; Exhibit Surveys, 7;

Films for the Humanities, 56; Grubb & Ellis, 55; Hale and Dorr, 13;

Industry Click, 14; InsureHiTech.com, 59; Kinko’s, 57; Gary Mertz

Architect, 58; The Mosso Group, 58; Neil Laboratories, 57; Novazyme

Pharmaceuticals, 56; Opinion Research Corporation, 58.

PeproTech, 57; Primedia, 14, 56; Princeton Video Image, 59;

Ramco Systems, 12; Sarnoff, 56; StatementOne, 60; Victor Co., 55;

Therics, 57; Trainfans, 58; ValiGen USA, 57.

Corrections or additions?


This page is published by PrincetonInfo.com

— the web site for U.S. 1 Newspaper in Princeton, New Jersey.

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