To the Editor

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This article was prepared for the March 20, 2002 edition of

U.S. 1 Newspaper. All rights reserved.

Between the Lines

We in the newspaper business can appreciate how aspiring

screenwriters must feel. It’s easy to look at a finished work and

see it in its artistic simplicity and think you can do it yourself.

After all, "artful" in its original meaning describes a

process

that completely disguises the effort expended on its making.

But until writer, Web developer — and aspiring screenwriter —

Angelina Sciolla approached us with a story idea, we had no idea just

how many of you there were out there.

We met Sciolla in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, at a place called the

Writers Room, where arts editor Nicole Plett was invited to give a

presentation on freelancing for U.S. 1 Newspaper. It was on a sunny,

Sunday afternoon, and Foster Winans, the engine behind this Doylestown

writers’ haven, helped us attract an audience of about 20 individuals

interested in freelancing fiction and non-fiction. We felt pretty

good about the turnout — until a couple of weeks later when a

screenwriting guru attracted an audience of 60.

By this time Sciolla had sent a query letter and a package of clips

that included the chronicle of how, at the Cannes Film Festival in

2001, she found herself selected by luck and by skill to pitch a

screenplay

idea to a panel of professionals. By reading her story, we learned

she not only got into the contest, but she won it.

Right away we knew we did not want Sciolla to write just any

non-fiction

story for us — we wanted the straight story on how and why

screenwriters

in the Delaware Valley suddenly seem to outnumber the poets. You will

find some answers from Sciolla beginning on page 33.

The glittering lure of motion pictures seems ever with us. Sciolla

works toward her dream of stepping up to accept an Oscar for a

screenplay

(truth be told she would settle for a dream about just seeing her

name flicker by during the closing credits) at the same time that

she holds down a good old 9-to-5 job as Web editor at Philadelphia’s

Fox Chase Cancer Center.

Of course all of us have been a little stage struck since Princeton’s

Nobel Prize-winning mathematician, John Forbes Nash Jr., and his wife,

Alicia, became grist for Hollywood-ization in "A Beautiful

Mind."

The Nashes have learned that having movie stars like Russell Crowe

and Jennifer Connelly portray them for audiences of untold millions

can be unnerving. However our local pride makes us glad that as long

as Ron Howard and producer Brian Grazer chose the Nash life story

as a vehicle for a feature film about mental illness, at least they

did it well enough to win the Golden Globe for best film of the year,

and a possible eight Oscars, depending on the luck of the draw come

Sunday night.

Top Of Page
To the Editor

Last night (March 5) attendance at JobSeekers jumped

33 percent compared to a week ago, from 33 to 44. Everyone there was

a competent manager or professional. Who says the recession is over?

Most of the newcomers said they had read about us in U.S. 1. Thank

you for publicizing us.

Niels Nielsen

JobSeekers

March 12, 2002. Thank you so much for assigning Phyllis Maguire to

write an article on Margot Adler. Margot said that it was one of the

best pieces ever written about her. We had approximately 100 people

at the event, and I’m sure this article helped spread the word. Margot

is a wonderful speaker and I’m very sorry you missed her. Thanks

again,

Nancy Nicholson

Barnes & Noble

MarketFair.

March 5, 2002. Thanks to all who helped make our premiere of "The

Mideast Optimist: Muslim and Jewish Comedians" such a success

last weekend. Over 650 people attended two sold out performances,

March 2 and 3.

Rev. Robert Moore, executive director

Coalition for Peace Action.


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