To the Editor: John Q’s Lesson

Open Letter to Governor McGreevey

Correction

Corrections or additions?

This article was prepared for the March 6, 2002 edition of

U.S. 1 Newspaper. All rights reserved.

Between the Lines

We would never call our weekend editor a genius (if

he were such a genius why does he get stuck in our office every

Sunday?).

But we have to admit he had a momentary stroke of genius this past

Sunday when he abruptly postponed our scheduled cover story —

on three guys in white shirts and ties with a new piece of technology

— and replaced it with Kathleen McGinn Spring’s feature on Michael

Gelb and his book on geniuses.

Gelb’s thesis that people with otherwise unspectacular intellects

can extract some valuable lessons from the lives of history’s great

geniuses appealed to all of us — unspectacular as we all are.

And the notion that optimism — such as that exhibited by Columbus

in the dark days of his first oceanic crossing — is a driving

force in ultimate success appealed to our weekend guy. "When are

you going to get a weekend off?" we keep asking. "Pretty

soon,"

he keeps answering. Oh well, maybe he knows something we don’t.

Who are those geniuses on the cover? On the left hand side of the

cover, top to bottom, are Brunelleschi (the 15th century architect),

Darwin, Copernicus, Einstein, and Jefferson. On the right hand side,

from the top, are Plato, Columbus, Elizabeth I, Shakespeare, and

Gandhi.

Top Of Page
To the Editor: John Q’s Lesson

THANKS SO MUCH for the story "Healthcare IRAs" (February 27).

It’s not surprising that CareGain’s crusade to reform the insurance

system has already produced so much interest: The American public

is fed up with paying huge monthly premiums to health insurance

providers

who stonewall them when it comes to reimbursement. As a friend wryly

commented, "These providers are only doing their job — their

job is to make sure we don’t get reimbursed!"

Yet those of us with health insurance are the lucky ones. It is a

scandal that millions of Americans, especially children, remain

uninsured.

Having lived in England for many years, I know that an alternative

system, while not always a perfect safety net, is possible.

The movie "John Q" taps into the rage experienced when dealing

with the current outrageous system. Perhaps the moral of last week’s

cover story is that we don’t need to resort to shotguns, as John Q

did. Instead, my hope is that on Sunday, March 10, Rush Holt will

suggest ways we can all become creative "crusaders for

reform."

Perhaps U.S. 1 Newspaper can do its usual super research job and run

a follow-up with the latest on New Jersey’s consumer healthcare rights

(do we have any?) and tips for cutting through the system’s red tape

that strangles rather than helps cure us.

Toby Israel

Walnut Lane, Princeton

Editor’s note: Israel’s timely letter refers to the

"Health

Insurance for the Uninsured" forum to be held on Sunday, March

10, at 4:30 p.m. at Princeton Township Hall at 369 Witherspoon Street.

Margaret Lancefield, medical director of the Medical Center at

Princeton

Outpatient Clinics, and her husband, Congressman Rush Holt,

representative

from the 12th District, will speak. Call 609-688-2055.

Top Of Page
Open Letter to Governor McGreevey

I am a neighbor of yours, with a house directly on Route 206 just

like Drumthwacket. You may have noticed that on the road, a large

distance from your house but unfortunately very close to mine, there

is quite a bit of truck traffic. These big 18-wheeler tractor-trailers

do not represent traffic of goods that benefit the Route 206 corridor

directly.

First, you will notice how much of that traffic is outside of what

would be considered normal business hours for the region. This traffic

intensifies between 3 and 6 a.m. or between 7 and 10 p.m.. It is

particularly

intense on Friday nights between 8 and 10 p.m. and again on Sundays

between 6 and 9 p.m.

Examination of the trucks is not very revealing, as some of the

companies

may be transport companies, and many are blank. Licenses are from

states other than New Jersey, sometimes from Canada, Minnesota, Iowa,

etc.

We can only speculate as to the reason these trucks follow this route,

although on one occasion I followed a truck carrying a pair of 30-foot

motorboats that were obviously not destined for Lake Carnegie. I

followed

this truck, which carried Washington State plates and a big

"Oversize"

sign, through Princeton, Hillsborough and Somerset all the way to

the connection to Interstate 287.

Thus, I conclude that these trucks use Route 206 as a shortcut from

195 to I-287, avoiding a big stretch of the New Jersey Turnpike,

cutting

on their tolls and driving distance at our expense. This occurs also

in the opposite direction.

These trucks are generally so big that to pass in front of my house,

where the street is narrow, they run way past the yellow line, into

the middle lane. They have a big problem negotiating the turn when

Route 206/Bayard turns into Route 206/State Road. The local police

say they don’t have jurisdiction over them and are not allowed to

stop them unless they are speeding. I also imagine that it would be

hard to stop them since there are no good places where such trucks

could stop without completely clogging traffic. State police should

monitor them, but I have not yet seen state police on Route 206.

I would like to propose some specific measures that could be taken

and may solve this problem:

1. Restrict truck traffic to weekdays from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. and

Saturdays

6 a.m. to 3 p.m.. Allow these trucks at all times only for local

delivery.

2. Enforce a more stringent control by State Police of the point 1

restriction on traffic that is not local at the two ends of Route

206 [Lawrenceville and Somerville] at all times, especially at night

and on Sundays. Traffic on Route 206 should serve the community living

between I-95 and I-287. It should not be a traffic shortcut to avoid

turnpike tolls.

3. Have more State Police patrolling trucks on Route 206. The New

Jersey Turnpike toll booths will show the difference.

4. Allow local police departments to help enforce these rules if

State Police is over-committed.

Other arguments to preserve the historical integrity of the villages

in Lawrenceville and Princeton and environmental have been used many

times before. The quality of life for all of us who live close or

on Route 206 will be greatly improved.

Roberto Weinmann

98 Bayard Lane

Top Of Page
Correction

The correct spelling for the vice president of administration at

Firmenich

is John Layendecker.


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