To the Editor: Toast Time

For the Dogs

Corrections or additions?

This article was prepared for the February 13, 2002 edition of

U.S. 1 Newspaper. All rights reserved.

Between the Lines

Top Of Page
To the Editor: Toast Time

You meet your boss while walking down the hall, and

he/she asks how’s that special project coming along? Or you

desperately

want to some remarks at a boisterous public meeting. Or at a session

with clients, you are challenged on a statement you or a colleague

made earlier. Crisis time? No, not if you have had Toastmaster

training

of the sort described by Kathleen McGinn Spring (U.S. 1, January 23).

The article features a Toastmaster club at the Carnegie Center and

the human elements that make the educational effort worthwhile. Table

Topics, part of typical Toastmaster meetings anywhere in the world

— it is truly an international organization — are

extemporaneous

and give the members splendid training in thinking quickly on their

feet and responding to those sometimes unexpected or even embarrassing

questions. Toastmaster offer the nervous speaker a warm and supportive

environment, one that I tell visitors can be used as a laboratory

for their presentations.

Decades ago I refused to give a talk to a large group at work on a

subject I knew well. Following that humbling experience, I vowed never

to say "no" to a speaking request. Toastmasters has given

me that confidence.

In this area are many people for whom English is a second language.

Among the people who phoned in response to the U.S. 1 article was

a man from Asia who wants to polish his language skills. Princeton

Toastmasters, a multicultural community club, looks forward to meeting

all those who called and welcomes them in the communications adventure

of a lifetime.

Michael Suber

Princeton Toastmasters, 609-921-6685.

Top Of Page
For the Dogs

Thank you so much for the article on my dog park (U.S.

1, January 16). It has made a tremendous impact on my membership.

Since that Wednesday I have signed up 35 dogs. I have 13 more

appointments,

and an additional 10 more applications waiting to be scheduled. Prior

to January 16, my website had a daily average session count of 41.

In the seven days following the article, the total session count

quadrupled;

it rose to 1,140.

By the way, how did you first hear of my park?

Gretchen Zimmer, www.rockytopdogpark.com

Editor’s note: Your question brings up one of the

interesting

aspects about U.S. 1 — how our deliverers bring in reports of

new businesses, and businesses that are moving. Marie Rendine, a

long-time

member of our team, found the Rocky Top Dog Park last December 5 along

Route 27 in Kingston. A reporter made a followup call the following

week and decided the enterprise had all the elements of an excellent

business story — as well as being an obviously terrific human

interest story. Some articles take much longer to get into print

— and some never see the light of day. It’s partly the luck of

the draw.

How the delivery team reports on new businesses is also an important

topic during February, as we work on the U.S. 1 2002 Business

Directory.

This week we will begin faxing and mailing coupons to all the

businesses

that we have on our roster. Please make any corrections to the

information

that we have on your business and return the coupon ASAP. Thank you

for your cooperation.


Previous Story


Corrections or additions?


This page is published by PrincetonInfo.com

— the web site for U.S. 1 Newspaper in Princeton, New Jersey.

Facebook Comments