Corrections or additions?

This article was prepared for the October 10, 2001 edition

of U.S. 1 Newspaper. All rights reserved.

A Sleuth with Class

They won’t be throwing bread rolls at the P.G. Wodehouse

convention this year. Philadelphia’s Sheraton Society Hill Hotel,

host of the national biennial meeting that will take place Friday,

October 12, through Sunday, October 14, won’t allow it. But there

will still be plenty of foolish antics at the gathering of fans of

Pelham Grenville Wodehouse, the British author, creator of the

dimwitted

Bertie Wooster and his sagacious valet, Jeeves.

Wodehouse, born in latter years of the 19th century, lived to the

ripe old age of 97. By the time of his death in 1975, he had become

beloved as one of the great humorists of the 20th century. Still a

best-seller, his most popular and enduring titles include "The

Butler Did It," "Right Ho, Jeeves," and "The Code

of the Woosters." While the novels have entertained and delighted

generations, interest was further boosted by the perpetually re-run

television dramatizations that starred Hugh Laurie as the chinless

man about town, Bertie, and Stephen Fry as his unflappable valet

Jeeves.

Now Alan Ayckbourn and Andrew Lloyd Webber are bringing "By

Jeeves,"

a play with music, to Broadway.

In 1980, the late Captain William Blood, a Bucks County resident,

formed a literary group in Wodehouse’s honor. The society now has

close to 1,000 members, throughout the world. The Wodehouse Society

members fan out from the U.S. and Britain to Sweden, Japan, India,

Malaysia, and Australia. Every continent except Antarctica is

represented

among its membership.

In conjunction with the convention, the Philadelphia Public Library

will be holding a Wodehouse exhibition through October at its main

building, on Parkway between 19th and 20th streets.

Wodehouse’s connection to Philadelphia is through to the Saturday

Evening Post, a Philadelphia mainstay for over 100 years. The Post

was where Wodehouse published his first Jeeves story. Between 1915

and 1965, Wodehouse published 14 novels and 36 short stories in the

Post, as well as non-fiction.

For information on the Wodehouse Society convention call

Rosie M. Banks at 609-465-3043 or go to

www.wodehouse.org/philadelphia/.

Friday, October 12, to Sunday, October 14.


Previous Story Next Story


Corrections or additions?


This page is published by PrincetonInfo.com

— the web site for U.S. 1 Newspaper in Princeton, New Jersey.

Facebook Comments